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City of Wichita

City Meeting With Wichita Neighborhoods To Plan Designs For New Splash Pads

The Wichita Park and Recreation department is getting closer to the design phase of its Aquatics Master Plan , which city council approved in February.

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Byblos

Dec 3, 2010

Wichita is a true destination for Lebanese food in this country.  We are really lucky to have so many great Lebanese restaurants here.

Now that we’re past Thanksgiving, it’s time to turn toward the season of Mr. C.

Thai House

Nov 19, 2010
Tanya Tandoc / KMUW

I love spicy food.  I love it when I eat something so hot that I get a little high from it, or start to hallucinate just a little.  I want to sweat and pant as I eat.  It may seem sadomasochistic to you, but it’s my kind of fun. If I eat enough chilies, people seem funnier and prettier and project fuzzy pink auras.  I’m not kidding.  I do it all the time.

There’s no way I could not take a walk this morning. Aside from the intensive lobbying of my Airedale friend Ollie, the blue Kansas sky and ruby leaves of our pin oaks overpowered me. So I hitched Ollie to the leash and out we went, fully engulfed in another splendid crispy November autumn morning.

Sport Burger

Nov 5, 2010

I have found that most people like to talk about food.  If you can’t think of anything clever to say at a party, you can always break the social ice by asking people what they like to eat.  It’s a nice way to start a conversation, and you might even learn something.

How exactly do robo-calls help politicians? You know what I’m talking about—those automated, prerecorded phone messages we get on our landlines (those of us who still have landlines).

I don’t know anyone who ever says, “Wow, I got the nicest, most informative robo-call the other day.  The information was so pertinent and it really convinced me that that person was the right one for the job!”

I lost a good friend last week and, in a way, so did you. His name was Arthur Schuetz. He died six days from his 99th birthday.

He was my neighbor for years in the College Hill area. Art lived a quiet life, to my knowledge never making any newscast, never getting his photo and name splashed across the newspapers, never running for public office, never having streets or schools or businesses named for himself.

Paleteria La Reyna

Oct 8, 2010

I’ve been walking a lot lately, and not just because the weather is finally behaving.  I’ve been trying to balance the amount of exercise I get with the number of popsicles I have been eating.  This summer was the summer of the the paleta for me.  A paleta is a Mexican popsicle, and I have been quite obsessed with them, to the point where I was eating one a day during the month of August, hence, the new exercise regime.

Greetings from The Land That Time Forgot, also known as Wichita, Kansas. We’ve been a little slow to accept some of them new-fangled things that other towns have had for years. Take bicycles, for instance. We weren’t too sure they’d catch on so we waited a while. Then the other day I noticed an actual bike lane on First Street in the College Hill area. Right there against the curb was the white outline of a bicycle indicating a bike lane. At first I thought it was a crime scene. Like on TV where the police draw a chalk outline around the victim, in this case a bicycle.

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Commentary

Ciboski: 2018 Election

The next election for Kansas governor is in November of 2018. How many candidates for Governor will there be for each major party?

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KMUW Music

Sunday, September 24

Sunday on Soulsations hear neo-soul singer Amel Larrieux. She’s known for her engaging vocals and contribution to movie soundtracks including Barbershop, Love Jones, Takers and Why Did I Get Married?  The beautiful songstress has been featured in Essence and Harper’s Bazaar magazines and a Coca-Cola campaign.

June Trieb

The Wichita Symphony Orchestra is seeking public input to help the organization plan for the future.

The Wichita Symphony launched an online survey to get feedback on things like the performance schedule and music style preferences.

Symphony CEO Don Reinhold says the community input will be used to help develop a new five-year strategic plan for the more than 70-year-old orchestra.

Blister Steel is the latest release from Portland, Oregon’s Roselit Bone. With founding member Joshua McCaslin further cementing his place as a lyricist/songwriter of the first order, the material conjures images of broken world, one that Cormac McCarthy might find one mark over the line of disturbing, one that Nick Cave might categorize as bleak. No doubt either/both man would find some semblance of catharsis in these songs. It’s more than darkness for darkness’s sake and McCaslin proves that there’s a separation between his often harrowing images and the man friends and strangers encounter on the street.

McCaslin adopted Portland as his hometown a decade ago, starting Roselit Bone as a duo circa 2013. The unit expanded to the nine-person mark with flute, trumpet, pedal steel, accordion and violin finding their place in the mix. Influenced by Mexican music and disparate Americana strains, the music on Blister Steel eludes easy categorization but one suspects its creator and executors wouldn’t have it any other way.

Though there are lyrical and musical threads that find their way through the songs on Blister Steel, some of the material reaches back to this album’s predecessor, 2014’s Blacken & Curl. “I sit on songs,” McCaslin says. Songs such as “Leech Child” and “By the Glint of Your Horns” were already in live rotation for a few years before the group committed them to tape. What is markedly different this time is that Roselit Bone has become a far more collaborative endeavor.

“With the first album it was mostly me alone in my warehouse space,” he recalls. “I would just layer things on my own. This time, I had nine or 10 different members who all had input. Generally, I write the songs so that they work all on their own as solo acoustic pieces. I’ll do trumpet arrangements and a lot of that stuff before I even bring it to the rest of the band. When I bring it to the band, I always make sure to leave room for the people who like to improvise and add atmospheric stuff, so they usually have space set aside for them in the compositions.”

Despite an expansive lineup, the material heard across Blister Steel and its predecessor rely on open spaces. The eeriness and emptiness of the world McCaslin has conjured into being crackles across the latest record’s 10 cuts. “It was never my intention to have such a big band,” he says. “It was a little more raw, aggressive and based in the Delta blues at first. As I got more into Western music and Mexican music, I started adding people.”

Valerie Osterberg (flute) and Barry A. Walker (pedal steel) came into the band as a couple. “I never thought of having pedal steel in the band until I heard Barry,” McCaslin recalls. “When I saw them, I just thought I should have them both in the band. But I wasn’t looking for them. A lot of times, I’ll see someone who’s a pretty great musician and then find a place for them. But I think I’m done,” he adds. “I’m capping it at 10.”

The roots of Roselit Bone’s sound can be traced to The Gun Club which led him to Son House and Skip James as well as Dave Von Ronk. “I really loved the Ragtime players,” he says. “I still love that sound and play like that quite a bit. When we were just a two-piece, that guitar style was the most prominent.”

He formed an early appreciation of Scott Joplin-style piano playing as well as the country music his grandparents loved. “Some of it was pretty bad but they did listen to Marty Robbins and a lot of old hillbilly music,” he says. Odetta came into the picture later but left a lasting impression. “I think she was the first folk artist that really embraced what I’d consider a Western sound,” he notes. “She had those operatic vocals and that minor key style of guitar playing that I loved.”

Within her music, he says, he found something akin to a lack of an internal dialogue. “It’s like reading a Cormac McCarthy novel or something,” he says. “If there’s violence described, it’s just part of the landscape and I think you can find some Odetta songs that are deeply like that.”

Though he can understand that some will draw comparisons between his own music and Americana, he’s not eager to segregate the music. “I think it has traditional elements without being hardcore traditional,” he says. “I’m not crazy about dividing up genres like some people. I grew up as a punk and goth kid. I get it. We’re obviously not making authentic Mexican music but there are people who see us showing respect to ranchero music and trying to work it into something new. They seem to like that. It’s not a novelty band for us, it’s another tool.”

As for the lyrical content and manner in which violence is represented in his songs, McCaslin chuckles slightly, hinting that it’s a question which comes up often.

“For a lot of the stuff that’s on this record, it wasn’t experienced firsthand, so there is a distance from it that I think allows me to safely write about it. But I’m not doing it out of novelty. A lot of this is drawn from people I know,” he says. “I feel like I’m privileged in that I can write about the things I do. I think that’s why you don’t see a lot of lyricists that go that deep, because it might hit a little too close to home.”

KMUW Music is celebrating the first day of autumn with three hours of music! Tune in to Global Village and Strange Currency on Friday, September 22 from 7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.

Global Village welcomes in the first day of Fall with songs of the season from a wide array of artists and styles of music, including Astor Piazzolla, Bob Dorough, Ralph Towner (with and without Oregon), Ahmad Jamal, and more.

Monday 9.18.17

Night Train marks birthdays of guitarist Emily Remler and trombonist John Fedchock; continues with the September Jazz Meets Classical feature for Classical Music Month with music from Hank Jones, Joe Zawinul and a special with Third Stream pioneer Gunther Schuller; and highlights new music from Ahmad Jamal, the Christian McBride Big Band, Louis Hayes and George Freeman.

Tuesday 9.19.17

Night Train continues its September salute to Classical Music Month with some suites – from Duke Ellington, Charlie Byrd, Wynton Marsalis and Claude Bolling. Plus new music from guitarists Russell Malone and Amanda Monaco, flutist Gerald Beckett,  saxophonist Jeff Coffin (from the Dave Matthews Band) and trumpeter Farnell  Newton.

Wednesday 9.20.17

Lots of clarinets tonight on the Night Train, with music from bebop clarinet pioneer Buddy DeFranco,  trad player Dr. Michael White, and such contemporary artists as Anat Cohn, Ken Peplowski and David Murray. Night Train also continues the Jazz Meets Classical/Classical Music Month feature with music from Paquito D’Rivera’s Jazz Meets the Classics album, and the Ted Rosenthal Trio’s remarkable reinvention of “Rhapsody in Blue.”

Thursday 9.21.17

Night Train marks several birthdays tonight – including acclaimed Wichita jazz fusion guitar pioneer Jerry Hahn, chamber jazz pioneer Chico Hamilton, Crescent City pianist Henry Butler, and bassist Slam Stewart. Plus we continue our Classical Meets Jazz feature and mark Leonard Cohen’s birthday with Rene Marie’s show-stopping medley of Suzanne/Bolero, and highlight new music from Akiko Tsuruga and the Pete Malinverni Trio.

Noteworthy

Deborah Shaar / KMUW

Music Theatre Wichita Watching Closely As City Considers Century II Recommendations

A community engagement process will begin this fall on preliminary plans for the future of Century II in downtown Wichita. City leaders are recommending expanding and renovating Century II instead of building new facilities. Four arts organizations are based at the blue domed performing arts center: Music Theatre Wichita, the Wichita Symphony Orchestra, Wichita Grand Opera and Music Theatre for Young People. Over the years, they’ve adapted and adjusted to the unique circular building and its...

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