Politics

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Stephen Koranda / KPR

Thousands of people in Kansas have incomplete voter registrations, which means they haven’t been able to vote. They were caught up in the state’s requirement that some people provide citizenship documents when registering. Now, a federal appeals court says many of those people should be allowed to vote in federal elections.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

Election officials in Kansas are starting the process of registering thousands of suspended voters after a federal court ruled the state is violating the National Voter Registration Act. Approximately 18,000 people have been unable to vote in local or national elections because they failed to provide proof of citizenship while registering at a DMV.

donkeyhotey / Flickr / Creative Commons

A Bernie Sanders supporter in Wichita is still holding out hope for her candidate to somehow be nominated at the National Democratic Convention in July, but if not, she plans to vigorously help to secure local wins for Democrats. Republicans are also seeking committed volunteers to help invigorate their campaigns.

Die-hard Sanders supporter Carri New is a delegate being sent to the National Democratic Convention in July. She says if Bernie Sanders concedes, she will turn most of her attention to Kansas races.

J. Schafer / Kansas Public Radio

A new statewide poll suggests that political change could be in the air for Kansas.

National political analyst John Zogby says 71 percent of voters surveyed gave low ratings on how the state is performing its duties. He says the research suggests that Kansans might feel betrayed, especially when it comes to state policy issues.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

For the first time in more than 30 years, there's a Democrat running in every Senate district in Kansas. But their fellow left-leaning Kansans might not be voting for them in August.

That’s because some are so fed up with Gov. Sam Brownback, they’d rather switch parties to vote for a moderate Republican in the primary than allow the governor’s supporters to stay in the Legislature.

Andy Marso / KHI News Service

A Kansas senator says a highway project in his district is back on schedule, drawing protests from Democrats who say Republican Gov. Sam Brownback picked that project over others to help a political ally in an election year.

The project to widen U.S. Highway 69 north of Pittsburg from two lanes to four was one of 25 delayed in April to help balance the state budget.

It sits in the district of Republican Sen. Jake LaTurner, who sent an open letter to Brownback decrying the delay.

Jim McLean / KHI News

The stage is set for what many believe could be a pivotal 2016 election season in Kansas.  

With campaigns for all 165 seats in the Legislature, the opportunity for change is reflected in the roster of candidates certified by Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach after Wednesday’s filing deadline.

Stephen Koranda, File Photo / Kansas Public Radio

Several veteran Kansas lawmakers announced their retirements ahead of June 1 noon filing deadline. And as Jim McLean reports, Kansas voters may decide to retire others.

At least 23 House and Senate members aren’t running for re-election, including two of the top three leaders in the House and several committee chairs.

Some are saying it was just time to step down. But others say the state’s ongoing budget problems have simply worn them out.

Rep. Tom Moxley, a moderate Republican from Council Grove, referenced the budget mess in his farewell to House colleagues.

Sean Sandefur / KMUW

Candidates running for office this fall could, in theory, call up a veritable army of support. For each party in every voting precinct, there’s a position for one committeeman and one committeewoman. Across Kansas, that would add up to roughly 14,000 precinct captains. But, most of the positions are likely to be left vacant for the 2016 elections.

wikipedia.org

While giving him two more weeks to comply, a federal judge let Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach know that she would tolerate no further delays in carrying out her order to restore 18,000 Kansas residents to the voter rolls.

The ruling was the latest development in a lawsuit challenging Kansas’ policy of requiring people who register to vote at DMV offices to provide proof of citizenship.

U.S. District Judge Julie Robinson didn’t buy Kobach’s claim that compliance with her order would cause voter confusion and lead to “irreparable harm.”

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