The Human Factor http://kmuw.org en The Human Factor: That's Not Science! http://kmuw.org/post/human-factor-thats-not-science <p>Throughout history snake oil salesmen have tried and succeeded at duping people with pseudo scientific nonsense:</p> Tue, 28 May 2013 14:00:35 +0000 Joseph R. Keebler 17896 at http://kmuw.org The Human Factor: That's Not Science! The Human Factor: A Bad Driver Or Just A Bad Day? http://kmuw.org/post/human-factor-bad-driver-or-just-bad-day-0 <p>The Fundamental Attribution Error is a concept derived from the field of social psychology. We are all guilty for committing this error.</p><p>As an example, try to think of a time that someone cut you off in traffic, or didn’t use their signal, or pulled out in front of you. Or maybe that time the wait staff at your favorite restaurant wasn’t quite nice. You were probably angry, frustrated and would have loved the opportunity to give that driver or waiter a piece of your mind.</p> Mon, 13 May 2013 17:30:00 +0000 Joseph R. Keebler 17105 at http://kmuw.org The Human Factor: A Bad Driver Or Just A Bad Day? The Human Factor: The Man Who Mistook His Wife For A Hat http://kmuw.org/post/human-factor-man-who-mistook-his-wife-hat <p>You may have heard of British neurologist Oliver Sacks’ book <i>The Man Who Mistook His Wife For A Hat</i>.</p><p>At the heart of that story was a disease called prosopagnosia, or as it’s more commonly called, face blindness. A person with face blindness can no longer process the visual information that allows them to recognize a face.</p><p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">The head remains but instead of it revealing itself as eyes, ears, nose and mouth, it becomes a scrambled puzzle.</span></p> Mon, 01 Apr 2013 17:13:39 +0000 Joseph R. Keebler 15008 at http://kmuw.org The Human Factor: The Man Who Mistook His Wife For A Hat The Human Factor: A Bad Driver Or Just A Bad Day? http://kmuw.org/post/human-factor-bad-driver-or-just-bad-day <p>The Fundamental Attribution Error is a concept derived from the field of social psychology. We are all guilty for committing this error.</p><p>As an example, try to think of a time that someone cut you off in traffic, or didn’t use their signal, or pulled out in front of you. Or maybe that time the wait staff at your favorite restaurant wasn’t quite nice. You were probably angry, frustrated and would have loved the opportunity to give that driver or waiter a piece of your mind.</p> Mon, 18 Mar 2013 15:43:34 +0000 Joseph R. Keebler 14295 at http://kmuw.org The Human Factor: A Bad Driver Or Just A Bad Day? The Human Factor: How Three Mile Island Could Have Been Prevented http://kmuw.org/post/human-factor-how-three-mile-island-could-have-been-prevented <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;"><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_Mile_Island_accident">Three Mile Island stands out as one of the greatest U.S. tragedies</a>, and possibly the first major disaster of the nuclear age. Being one of the first, and one of the most publicized reactor meltdowns in world history, it would be almost a decade before the disaster was <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chernobyl_disaster">overshadowed by that of Chernobyl</a>.</span></p> Mon, 04 Mar 2013 18:00:00 +0000 Joseph R. Keebler 13606 at http://kmuw.org The Human Factor: How Three Mile Island Could Have Been Prevented The Human Factor: How Do You Know How To Hold A Coffee Mug? http://kmuw.org/post/human-factor-how-do-you-know-how-hold-coffee-mug <p>Human Factors aims to better integrate humans and systems to increase effectiveness and safety, and to reduce errors and accidents.</p><p>Sometimes, these systems can be simple, such as a human using a pen; and sometimes they can be much more complex, such as the systems in place to launch shuttles and rockets into orbit. One principle that is often used in our field is called “Affordance.”<br><br>Affordances are defined as a quality of an object or environment that makes it obvious what that object or environments purpose or function is.</p> Mon, 18 Feb 2013 18:30:00 +0000 Joseph R. Keebler 12894 at http://kmuw.org The Human Factor: How Do You Know How To Hold A Coffee Mug? The Human Factor: Superstition http://kmuw.org/post/human-factor-superstition <p>Superstitious behaviors, or the belief that supernatural forces have a causal effect on events, are prevalent throughout all human cultures.</p><p>But humans aren’t the only beings subject to this behavior. In fact, scientific research on superstitious behavior began accidentally with pigeons.</p> Mon, 04 Feb 2013 19:09:26 +0000 Joseph R. Keebler 12181 at http://kmuw.org The Human Factor: Superstition The Human Factor: Eyewitness Testimony http://kmuw.org/post/human-factor-eyewitness-testimony <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Eyewitness testimony is often highly regarded by juries and those who write television crime dramas.</span></p><p>Many people believe that their memory is infallible. Whatever they experience is recorded, frame by frame, like a movie, for later retrieval. Depending on one’s own personal history and past experiences, memories can in fact diverge significantly from the actual event.<span style="line-height: 1.5;">Anxiety, stress, and how questions are worded can conspire to create false memories.</span></p> Mon, 21 Jan 2013 18:30:00 +0000 Joseph R. Keebler 11482 at http://kmuw.org The Human Factor: Eyewitness Testimony