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Nadya Faulx / KMUW

Texas and four other Republican-led states filed another lawsuit Tuesday seeking to roll back the Obama administration's efforts to strengthen transgender rights, saying new federal nondiscrimination health rules could force doctors to act contrary to their medical judgment or religious beliefs.

The lawsuit is the second in recent months in which conservative states have sued over federal efforts to defend transgender rights.

Sedgwickcounty.org

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach defended the state’s voter registration law in a federal appeals court on Tuesday. He says thousands of Kansans who registered to vote at the DMV without proving their citizenship should not be allowed to cast ballots.

A lower court said in May that those Kansans can vote, but Kobach wants that overturned. Kobach told the appeals court that Kansas is allowed to require citizenship documents that aren’t required under federal law.

Wikipedia, IMDb and Rotten Tomatoes

On this month's KMUW Movie Club, it's all about classroom shenanigans and hittin' the road.

For some reason, I have this thing for unlikable characters. I find enjoyment out of pushing myself far enough to empathize with them. The more unlikable, the better. "Election," and by extension, most of Alexander Payne's films, has characters that fit this bill. Tracy Flick and Mr. McAlister are the types of people you would never want to meet in real life, but they do exist, and they are closer to you than you think.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

The Wichita Fire Department celebrates 130 years today.

Sgt. Stuart Bevis says Wichita Fire gets between 60,000 and 70,000 calls a year, although only about 2,000 of those are for actual fires. The rest are medical calls the department responds to alongside Emergency Management Services.

“All of those calls take resources from us," Bevis says. "Even if we may have a little bit of a down-drop where we only have a few significant fires in a few days, there’s always plenty of other things that are keeping us really hopping.”

Uncle Roy's Tavern / Facebook

The flash flood that filled downtown Mulvane last weekend caused more than $1 million in damage.

Mulvane City Administrator Kent Hixson says several feet of water from Styx Creek flooded the Main Street area following Friday’s heavy rain. At least 57 residential structures and about five commercial buildings were damaged.

Hixson says several inches of water flooded the city’s community room.

"That ruined the carpet and ruined some sheetrock, so we’re in the process of getting the carpet out and getting that dried out and getting that back in business," he says.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach is asking a federal appeals court on Tuesday to prevent thousands of Kansans from potentially casting ballots in the fall election.

As Stephen Koranda reports, this is the latest in a long series of litigation over Kansas voter registration requirements.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

Sedgwick County is planning to expand the Regional Forensic Science Center in order to meet the increasing demand for DNA analysis in criminal cases.

The $4 million project will begin in 2018, and it will be the second expansion in the center’s 21-year history. KMUW’s Deborah Shaar had an opportunity to see how crime science happens.

Abigail Wilson / KMUW/File photo

Updated on 08/23/16 at 10:00 a.m:

The Wichita Public Schools board voted on Monday to approve the budget for the next school year.

The 662 million dollar budget passed 5 to 0, with 2 board members absent.

Mulvane Downtown / Facebook

Some residents in Mulvane are seeking assistance from the American Red Cross after flood waters rose quickly in the area over the weekend.

Dozens of residents have contacted the Red Cross at a service center in Mulvane. Executive director Michelle Jantz says people came into the center talking about how they didn’t expect the flood to move so rapidly.

"You know, they’re just talking about their homes, and the damage that they're seeing, and the personal belongings that are destroyed," she says.

Dave Ranney, File Photo / Heartland Health Monitor

Governor Sam Brownback’s administration is pursing changes to some state employment policies. That includes modifying how Kansas agencies handle layoffs.

The proposals would change how Kansas agencies determine who gets laid off first and give agencies discretion to protect certain employees.

Rebecca Proctor, with the Kansas Organization of State Employees, says the changes would reduce the value of experience and years of service and make the process more subjective.

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