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Wearable technology can track your movement, location, heart rate and even what you’re looking at, and two researchers from Wichita State University want to know how secure this stored data is.

Professors Jibo He of the psychology department and Murtuza Jadliwala of the electrical engineering and computer science department were recently awarded a three-year grant worth $380,000 by the National Science Foundation.

Johnson County, Kansas, Sheriff's Office

A jury has convicted a white supremacist of killing two adults and a child at Kansas City-area Jewish sites last year.

The man who admitted killing three people at two suburban Kansas City Jewish sites was convicted of murder and other charges Monday, shortly after he told jurors he hoped to "die a martyr" for the shootings.

After the jury of seven men and five women returned the verdict, Frazier Glenn Miller, 74, of Aurora, Missouri, said "the fat lady just sang." Next, the jury will deliberate the sentence for Miller, who could face the death penalty.

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Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach is pushing a plan to cancel voter registrations if they aren’t completed within 90 days. Kansas law requires people registering to vote for the first time to prove their citizenship, and more than 30,000 voter registrations are on hold because they don't include the documents. As KPR’s Stephen Koranda reports, a hearing Wednesday will give the public a chance to weigh in on the plan.

A Wichita man who plotted a suicide bomb attack at Dwight D. Eisenhower Airport, formally known as Wichita Mid-Continent Airport, has been sentenced to 20 years in federal prison. KMUW’s Abigail Wilson reports the had planned to cause what he described as “maximum carnage..."

401(K) 2012, flickr Creative Commons

Kansans who owe back taxes to the state should consider paying them in the next few weeks.

The state is waiving interest and penalties on back taxes, starting Tuesday through Oct. 15.

The amnesty program is available to Kansans who owe individual and business tax debt that accrued before Dec. 31, 2013. The taxes must be repaid in full.

Officials with the Kansas Department of Revenue estimated the tax amnesty program could bring in up to $30 million.

Sean Sandefur

The Wichita Public School District has recently asked the state for additional funding to help with an influx of young refugees. These students often require years of tutoring before they’re ready to join the rest of the student body, but the district’s budget is tight. KMUW’s Sean Sandefur visited a Wichita elementary school to see how students, teachers and administrators are doing.

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The City of Wichita is asking residents to provide further input on the hiring of the next Wichita Police Department Chief.

Questions for the two finalists in the search for the next chief of police can be submitted through the city’s website. The public will also have a chance to ask the candidates questions tonight at the Wichita Police Chief candidates’ forum at Century II’s Convention Hall.

sfgamchick, flickr Creative Commons

Some Midwest farmers are cheering a legal ruling that delays new water pollution rules. As Harvest Public Media’s Kristofor Husted reports, the regulations had been slated to go into effect on Friday.

The rules give the EPA power to regulate some streams and tributaries under the Clean Water Act. A federal judge issued an injunction, which will put the rules on pause in thirteen states…including Colorado, Missouri, Nebraska and North and South Dakota.

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Kansas child care advocates say the state’s new welfare law could jeopardize a $42 million federal grant. State officials disagree.

The welfare law at issue was passed by conservative Republicans to tighten eligibility requirements and move low-income Kansans off welfare and into jobs.

Some of the changes in the law could make it harder for some welfare recipients to maintain their eligibility without interruption, says Shannon Cotsoradis, CEO of the nonprofit advocacy group Kansas Action for Children.

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Some advocates for seniors and Kansans with disabilities are calling for changes in the state’s privatized Medicaid program. As Jim McLean of the Kansas Health Institute reports, they want a more independent process for resolving disputes over services.

More from Dave Ranney at the Heartland Health Monitor.

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