News

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio/File photo

The Kansas House has approved a bill that would expand the Medicaid health care program in Kansas to include people making 138 percent of the federal poverty level. Expanding KanCare would potentially offer health insurance for thousands of low-income Kansans.

The legislation passed on an 81-44 vote, but must still go through the Senate and face a possible veto from Gov. Sam Brownback, who has been a critic of Medicaid expansion. Republican Rep. Susan Concannon says supporters are not deterred.

Jim McLean / Kansas News Service

This is the second in a two-part series on KanCare. Listen to part one here.

Kansas was out in front of just about every other state in 2013 when it fully privatized its Medicaid program and renamed it KanCare.

The switch to managed care was one of the first big policy changes made by Gov. Sam Brownback, who promised it would both improve health care and lower costs.

KanCare was immediately controversial.

Grant Gerlock / Harvest Public Media

The Trump administration is voicing its support for the ethanol industry, but without specifics, it is hard to say what that means exactly for Midwest farmers.

In a letter to industry leaders gathered at the National Ethanol Conference, President Donald Trump said renewable fuels “are essential to America’s energy strategy.”

The president wrote that he aims to reduce the regulatory burden on the renewable fuels industry, but did not detail specific plans.

Kansas News Service file photo

Update Thursday, 11:23 a.m.: In final action, House Bill 2064 passed the House 81-44. It now goes on to the Senate.

Supporters of expanding Medicaid eligibility to more low-income Kansans succeeded Wednesday in a last-gasp effort to advance a bill, overpowering opponents who thought they had blocked it earlier in the week.

Sedgwick County Zoo

The Sedgwick County Zoo in Wichita welcomed another baby gorilla Wednesday morning.

The lowland gorilla was born to 23-year-old Matt and 22-year-old Kigali; it's their first baby together.

The zoo says that the baby has been observed nursing, and is clinging well and looks strong. They haven’t said whether the new baby is a boy or a girl.

alamosbasement, flickr Creative Commons

Derby Public Schools is holding two public forums on Wednesday night to gather the community's input on the district's next superintendent.

The Kansas Association of School Boards (KASB) is helping the Derby school district gather input from students, teachers, and other community members on what they want in a new leader.

Current Superintendent Craig Wilford is set to retire on June 30.

The forums are scheduled for 5:15 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday evening in Derby High School’s lecture hall.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Editor's note: This post was updated at 4:34 p.m.

The Kansas Senate failed Wednesday to override Gov. Sam Brownback's veto of a bill that would have rolled back big portions of his signature 2012 tax cuts. 

Lawmakers voted 24-16 against the effort to overturn the veto. Supporters were three votes short of the two-thirds majority of 27 votes needed in the 40-member chamber. The vote came hours after legislators in the House had voted, by a narrow margin, to override the veto.

Andy Marso / Kansas News Service

All that Michael Sykes has to show for his months-long quest to get his mother’s nursing home bed covered by KanCare is a pile of paperwork.

Sykes has already appealed an initial denial of his mom’s coverage and been turned down again. He’s mulling his options. But even before the denials, he was struggling to get answers.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Updated Wednesday at 9:18 a.m.  

Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback held a ceremony Wednesday morning to veto a bill that would roll back personal income tax cuts he's championed. (Almost immediately, House lawmakers voted 85-40 to override the veto; the matter now goes to the Kansas Senate.) Brownback had called the bipartisan measure for fixing the state's persistent budget problems "an assault on the pocketbooks of the middle class."

Nadya Faulx / KMUW/File photo

Kansas teachers scored a big victory today in the Statehouse.

The vote on an amendment that reinstates due process for teachers facing firing was both unexpected and contentious.

Up until 2014, all teachers in Kansas with three years experience had the right to a hearing before being dismissed.

That right was stripped as lawmakers hurried to wrap up their session three years ago.

Democratic Rep. Jerry Stogsdill from Prairie Village lead the charge for the amendment.

Pages