News

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The Sedgwick County Commission approved funding and renewed its partnership with the Project Access health care program Wednesday.

Project Access coordinates medical care and the supplies needed to treat people who are low-income or don’t have insurance. Doctors donate their time to treat eligible patients, hospitals donate the use of their facility, and thousands of dollars worth of medical equipment and prescription medicines are donated as needed during treatment.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Lawmakers in a Kansas House committee are considering Gov. Sam Brownback’s plan to liquidate state investments to fill a budget hole.

The proposal would basically drain the investment fund of more than $300 million and pay that back over seven years, with interest.

Brownback's budget director, Shawn Sullivan, told the House Appropriations Committee that the choices may be this or budget cuts.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

A Wichita nun delivered a petition Wednesday calling on U.S. Rep. Mike Pompeo to refrain from using torture if he's confirmed as head of the CIA.

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Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach is asking the Legislature to give him authority to bar potentially tens of thousands of people from casting votes in state or local races.

The Lawrence Journal World reported the Republican asked a Senate committee Tuesday for legislation giving him power to hold "bifurcated" elections in Kansas.

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Last month, the City of Wichita placed signs in College Hill Park prohibiting bicycle riding. The signs took many people who live in the area by surprise, but technically, bikes aren't allowed on interior walkways in any Wichita parks.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach continues with his prosecution of alleged voter fraud. Peggy Lowe with the Kansas News Service reports that he’s expected to file a ninth case today.

A spokeswoman from Kobach’s office says the new voter fraud case is being filed in Shawnee County in Topeka.

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Kansas higher education officials say in three years, the state needs thousands more students graduating college. Today, the Board of Regents will take a step towards that goal.

Right now about 40,000 students in Kansas are awarded a bachelor’s degree, an associate’s degree or some kind of certification each year.

That number, the state says, needs to bump up to 53,000. To meet the need of businesses in the state, 40 percent will need to be four-year degrees, and the rest will need to be two-year degrees or certificates.

Abigail Beckman / KMUW

A local non-profit coalition hoping to curtail prescription and illicit drug and alcohol abuse came together Tuesday to spread the word about prevention and renew their efforts.

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The Wichita City Council approved plans Tuesday to study the police department’s needs as it prepares to build a new station.

The Wichita Police Department is planning to build a new facility to replace its aging Patrol East substation near Kellogg and Edgemoor. It was built in 1989 for about 40 people—now, 140 people work there, Chief Gordon Ramsay told council members.

The city’s Capital Improvement Program includes more than $2 million for a new facility. $125,000 of that will be used to first study how to design a modern police station.

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Two-thirds of states across the country -- including Kansas -- are facing budget challenges.

Several states, including Arizona, Minnesota, Utah and New Jersey, are expected to come out ahead financially for the current fiscal year and the upcoming one beginning July 1. But others are projected to have budget shortfalls reaching hundreds of millions -- and in some cases, billions -- of dollars.

North Dakota has a budget hole of about $1.4 billion over the next two years. Oklahoma is expected to fall short by close to $870 million in the upcoming fiscal year.

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