News

The Kansas Association of Broadcasters named KMUW 89.1 FM the large market radio station of the year for the fourth year in a row.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

Candidates for the Wichita Public School Board spoke at a forum Thursday night hosted by the Wichita Regional Chamber of Commerce.

Questions were submitted by members of the chamber, and focused on topics including school choice, transparency in the board's decision-making process, and workforce development.

Chamber President Gary Plummer said after the forum that his organization is very involved in workforce issues on a policy level. He said the event was a chance for members to hear where candidates stand.

Kansas News Service/File photo

Phyllis Gilmore, the secretary of the Kansas Department for Children and Families, is coming under increasing fire because of problems in the state foster care system.

Former legislator and current Republican candidate for governor Mark Hutton is calling on Gov. Sam Brownback to fire Gilmore. He says revelations about missing foster children are the latest in a “near endless stream of failures.”

In a recent interview, he also expressed frustration about reports of children having to spend the night in the offices of the state’s foster care contractors.

Krisofor Husted / Harvest Public Media

There will be new restrictions on the weed killer dicamba for the 2018 growing season, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says.

The broadly defined restrictions, similar to what the state of Missouri imposed over the summer, were announced Friday in a news release. The EPA says it reached an agreement with agriculture giants Monsanto, BASF and DuPont on ways to tamp down on dicamba drift, which has been blamed for destroying or damaging millions of acres of crops in the United States.

Wichita Parks Foundation

Kansas drivers could soon sport the Wichita flag on their license plates. The city of Wichita is trying to build support in the state Legislature to approve a line of Wichita flag plates.

City leaders unveiled a design at the mayor's briefing Thursday.

Council member Bryan Frye said in order to get the plates made, the city needs to demonstrate to lawmakers the public's interest.

"This only works if we get the demand from the public for these plates," he said.

Jason Rojas / Flickr, Creative Commons

The Wichita Police Department is undergoing implicit bias training this month. It's just one of several efforts designed to improve community relations.

During the last year, the department has offered training to officers on racial awareness and fair and impartial policing.

This time, Police Chief Gordon Ramsay says the entire department of 850 people, officers and support staff, will go through the bias training.

Carla Eckels

Domestic violence affects one in three women in the U.S. For the past 20 years, a local Wichita organization has worked to help survivors of domestic abuse transition to better living.

American Advisors Group / flickr Creative Commons

The 2018 housing forecast shows that home prices will rise and brisk competition will remain among buyers for mid-ranged priced homes.

In 2017, more than one-third of the homes across the state are selling in 10 days or less. That’s especially true for homes priced between $100,000 and $250,000. Stan Longhofer, director of WSU's Center for Real Estate, says demand is really strong in the Wichita housing market, but there aren’t enough homes available for sale.

"As a result, we hav

WPD Facebook/File

The Wichita Police Department is testing a new type of high-tech body camera that it says will reduce the risk of human error.

All officers were outfitted last year with body-worn cameras, but police Chief Gordon Ramsay says technology has already advanced. The department is trying out 12 new body cameras that are blue-tooth capable and can turn on automatically.

“We’ve seen across the country where officers forget to turn the cameras on, and valuable footage is not captured," Ramsay said at an event earlier this week.

Mabel Lamour/Belma/ReineMab / flickr Creative Commons

Federal regulators have ordered Via Christi Health in Wichita to suspend a senior care program because of "severe" deficiencies.

The program, Via Christi HOPE, is designed to help senior citizens in Sedgwick County stay in their homes by offering a complete health care plan involving primary care, specialists and nurses.

The Joplin Globe reports the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services said program should not enroll new clients because it was not providing participants with medically necessary services.

Pages