Stephen Koranda / KPR

A lawsuit is targeting Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach over a new rule he put in place that will cancel incomplete voter registrations. The suit also asks a federal court to overturn the Kansas requirement that voters supply documents proving their citizenship.

More than 30,000 Kansas voter registrations have been put on hold because they don’t include the citizenship documents. Kobach’s new rule would cancel those incomplete registrations once they are 90 days old.

Stephen Koranda

Gov. Sam Brownback has proclaimed October as “Zombie Preparedness Month.” That not-so-serious name is aimed at getting people to think about a serious topic.

Brownback stood next to 15-year-old Faith Tucking, who was decked out in bloody zombie makeup, as he signed the proclamation Wednesday. The idea behind “Zombie Preparedness Month” in Kansas is an eye-catching way to think about emergencies. The supplies needed to survive a zombie attack will actually benefit you in other emergencies.

surber, flickr Creative Commons

The Siemens plant in Hutchinson will soon provide more than 60 nacelles for a new wind farm in Oklahoma.  

Kansas Democrats expect to pick a longtime Wichita-area activist as their new state chairman this weekend after the resignation of a leader who suggested rebranding the party.

Prominent Democrats say Derby attorney Lee Kinch emerged quickly as the favored candidate for the job. The party's state committee plans to meet Saturday in Salina to select the new leader.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

Wichita State University is focusing on the I-35 corridor for its next recruitment strategy.

WSU is offering reduced out-of-state tuition rates for Texas and Oklahoma residents--the same break it currently gives those from neighboring states like Missouri. Students who attend Wichita State from those states will pay one-and-a-half times the in-state tuition costs.

WSU Senior Vice President and Provost Tony Vizzini says recruiting along the Interstate 35 corridor makes sense.

Abigail Wilson file photo

The debate over the size and role of government isn’t just polarizing national politics. It's also causing divisions in Kansas at the state and local levels. Heartland Health Monitor’s Jim McLean has the story about how public health programs here in the state's largest county have been thrust into the center of that debate.

Bloomsberries, flickr Creative Commons

A federal appeals court will not reconsider its decision that an abortion opponent must stand trial over a letter she sent to a Wichita doctor saying someone might place an explosive under the doctor's car.

The 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals rejected a move seeking either a rehearing by the three-judge appeals panel or by the full court.

In July, a panel ruled that the decision about whether anti-abortion activist Angel Dillard's letter constituted a "true threat" should be left to a jury.

Certain health insurance options for state workers in Kansas will more than double in cost next year.

Rebecca Proctor with the Kansas Organization of State Employees says employees on the lower end of the pay scale often choose a plan with cheaper premiums and a higher deductible. Those plans will see the largest increase, with one option jumping from $50 per paycheck to more than $130.

Jeff Engel, flickr Creative Commons

The corn harvest in Kansas is ahead of schedule, according to the latest report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Across Kansas, 42 percent of corn has already been harvested—way ahead of the 34 percent posted this time last year. The corn is currently rated at 3 percent very poor, 9 poor, 31 fair, 47 good, and 10 excellent.

But estimates released this month say total yields will about two percent less than last year.

Stephen Koranda file photo

It’s not easy for the board that organizes legal defense for poor Kansans charged with crimes. As KPR’s Stephen Koranda reports, in some areas they’re running low on attorneys willing to work for what they can pay.

It can be hard to find attorneys willing to work on high-level defense cases for $65 per hour--that’s according to Patricia Scalia, director of the Kansas State Board of Indigents’ Defense Services. She says they’re already sometimes seeking attorneys who don’t live near the defendants, requiring a lot of travel.