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Cargill

Cargill released more details at the weekly mayor's briefing Thursday about its new downtown building, which will serve as the company's North American protein headquarters. They're currently located at 151 N. Main in downtown Wichita.

The $60 million facility will be located at the site of the current Wichita Eagle building at Douglas and Rock Island in Old Town. The Eagle has not announced where it will relocate. Cargill's new four-story, roughly 180,000-square-foot building will accommodate more than 800 employees and include an on-site parking garage.

Phil Cauthon for KHI News Service

An employee at Osawatomie State Hospital is suing the state of Kansas after she allegedly was raped at the institution.

The federal lawsuit filed Wednesday alleges female employees at the hospital were sexually and verbally abused by male patients, creating a "sexually hostile work environment."

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

A report released Thursday shows Kansas revenues last month narrowly beat the state's new, more pessimistic estimate.

Kansas tax collections in November met the estimate almost exactly on the dot.

healthcare.gov

Close to 25,000 Kansans have signed up for health insurance through the online marketplace, despite uncertainty about the future of the Affordable Care Act under a new administration.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Service reported Wednesday that 24,778 people in Kansas had signed up for insurance since open enrollment for 2017 started Nov. 1. The number of people seeking insurance was up less than 2 percent compared to the same period during open enrollment last year.

Abigail Wilson / KMUW/File photo

Wichita State University's Shocker Neighborhood Coalition is conducting a door-to-door survey in the surrounding Fairmount neighborhood to help better understand the needs of the residents.

The survey is part of the coalition’s overall community engagement efforts to help guide future development in the area. The campaign, launched by WSU’s Hugo Wall School of Public Affairs, is funded by a grant from the Kansas Health Foundation to address health, social and quality of life issues.

vox_efx / Flickr / Creative Commons

Sedgwick County voters cast 42,544 write-in votes during the general election, a record number up 22 percent from 2012. But whose names did they write, and why?

Chief Deputy Elections Officer Sandra Gritz says people choose to vote for someone other than the candidates who's names are printed on the ballots for a variety of reasons.

"Everything from there being only one candidate for an office to people just wanting to voice their opinions," she says.

The Workforce Alliance of South Central Kansas

The Workforce Alliance of South Central Kansas is launching a new job-training program that’s designed to get more people into the advanced manufacturing industry.

The Workforce Alliance is coordinating a tuition-free training program that’s expected to start next spring. The U.S. Department of Labor awarded a $6 million grant for the project.

Students at Wichita State University, Hutchinson Community College and Wichita Area Technical College will be able to get paid on-the-job training at area manufacturers in addition to their classroom education.

Sedgwick County Sheriff's Office

A trial date has been set for the three Kansas men accused of plotting to bomb Muslim immigrants in Garden City.

A jury trial is scheduled for April 25 at the federal courthouse in Wichita. Patrick Stein, Gavin Wright and Curtis Allen were arrested in October for conspiring to use a weapon of mass destruction.

The three defendants, none of whom live in Garden City, were allegedly planning to bomb an apartment complex there that’s home to more than 100 Muslim immigrants from Somalia. They have all pleaded not guilty.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach says he supports President-elect Donald Trump’s claim that millions of illegal votes were cast in the election.

State Bridge Office, ksdot.org

A new program in Kansas is working to find ways to use drones to help with bridge and tower inspections.

The Kansas Unmanned Aerial Systems program was created to help several state agencies tap into drone technology to improve processes and save money. Test flights began this month to help the Kansas Department of Transportation’s bridge inspection teams.

UAS Director Bob Brock says using drones will help improve the safety of KDOT workers.

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