News

Courtesy Eric Hammond

The last day of classes at Wichita’s Southeast High School is tomorrow, and there’s nostalgia in the air as teachers pack up and prepare to move from the current school at Edgemoor & Lincoln to their new building in east Wichita.

History and government teacher Eric Hammond says Southeast is a busy place.

"There's boxes galore," he says. "Boxes everywhere."

He, along with other staff and students, are moving. Hammond has been teaching at Southeast High School for six years.

Stephen Koranda file photo

Budget problems are forcing Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback to make cuts in the state Medicaid program that he once said he wouldn’t make.

In 2012, Brownback was pushing lawmakers to approve his plan to privatize Medicaid. In his State of the State speech that year he said creating KanCare would save money--and do it in a more responsible way than other states.

“Now many states are either kicking people off of Medicaid or paying doctors and other providers less," he said. "Neither of these choices providers better outcomes.”

Deborah Shaar / KMUW

Several churches in Wichita offer dinners for the public and hold bake sales each year. It helps them reach out to the community, and it helps their bottom lines.

Two festivals featuring Lebanese food have been drawing big crowds to St. George and St. Mary churches for eight decades.

More than a thousand people came to St. Mary’s Mediterranean Festival this past weekend. KMUW’s Deborah Shaar takes us inside the kitchen where it all begins.

Jimmy Everson, DVM, flickr Creative Commons

Kansas' state universities are calling for tuition increases of up to 5 percent, at least for now.

The schools submitted their tuition proposals Wednesday to the governing Kansas Board of Regents. But those came before Gov. Sam Brownback signed a budget bill Wednesday afternoon that cuts higher education funding by 4 percent, 1 percent more than the universities had expected.

City of Wichita

The Sedgwick County Commissioners formally approved plans for a new law enforcement training center to be shared with the City of Wichita.

The unanimous vote today meets a deadline in the bid process and clears the way for the project to move forward. The city and county want to build a $9.5 million state-of-the-art training facility on Wichita State University’s Innovation Campus.

The Kansas Board of Regents and other state entities would have to approve any facility built on the WSU campus.

Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback is criticizing the Obama administration's directive on the treatment of transgender students at public schools as "an unprecedented example of executive over-reach."

The U.S. departments of justice and education said last week transgender students must be allowed to use bathrooms and locker rooms consistent with their gender identity because federal law prohibits discrimination against those students. The administration says schools that refuse to comply could face federal lawsuits and lose federal aid.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Gov. Sam Brownback is cutting most state agencies 4 percent to balance the Kansas budget for next year.

Lawmakers approved an unbalanced budget that required the governor to make almost $100 million in spending reductions to comply with the state Constitution. Brownback’s budget director, Shawn Sullivan, says the governor exempted some agencies and K-12 schools.

Mike Mozart, flickr Creative Commons

A group of Nebraska farmers is suing the giant seed and chemical company, Monsanto, saying the company’s herbicide, Roundup, gave them cancer.

Three Nebraska farmers and an agronomist filed the suit alleging that Roundup caused their illness and that Monsanto downplayed research showing the chemical’s cancer risk. Similar cases have been filed in California, New York, and Delaware. Monsanto says the claim is not supported by science.

Abigail Wilson / KMUW

The Board of Education for Wichita Public Schools voted unanimously to reduce the district's spending by $18 million for the 2016-17 school year.

Stephen Koranda, File Photo / KPR

Gov. Sam Brownback has vetoed a bill that included provisions prompted by a multi-million dollar tax dispute with pizza magnate Gene Bicknell.

The Lawrence Journal-World reports that the bill that Gov. Sam Brownback vetoed on Tuesday was designed to help taxpayers challenge rulings of the Board of Tax Appeals. Under the ruling, taxpayers would be allowed to appeal decisions from the governor-appointed board to district court, where they could present new evidence.

Pages