News

Hugo Phan / KMUW

The QuikTrip store at 13th and Oliver in northeast Wichita is expected to close for good Thursday night. It follows the Walmart Neighborhood Market that closed nearby last week. One city official is assessing the area and seeking input on what's next for the property.

Center for Economic Development and Business Research

A university study projects the number of Kansans older than 65 will double in the next 50 years and outnumber children for the first time in state history.

The forecast released Wednesday by Wichita State University's Center for Economic Development and Business Research also projects a 21.8 percent increase between 2014 and 2064 as the Kansas population reaches more than 3.5 million people. That is slower than the growth rate for the nation.

Doug Kerr / Flickr Creative Commons

A lobbying campaign being waged by highway contractors has Kansas lawmakers on the defensive.

Billboards put up by the contractors accuse Gov. Sam Brownback and lawmakers of committing “highway robbery” by diverting more than a billion dollars from the transportation department to plug holes in the state budget.

Sen. Jeff Melcher fired back at a Statehouse hearing today Wednesday. The Leawood Republican called the charges a “gross misrepresentation of reality.”

Richard Ross

A new bill aimed at reforming juvenile justice has been introduced in the Kansas Statehouse. Advocates of the bill say it will keep low-risk youth offenders out of prison while saving the state money.

According to the advocacy group Kansans United for Youth Justice, 35 percent of young people locked up in the state are there for misdemeanors only, something that’s not done for adult offenders.

Kansas legislators are among those in several states considering measures to prohibit local governments from refusing to cooperate with federal immigration officials.

One bill would ban so-called sanctuary cities. The other would also withdraw state funding from cities that don't cooperate with immigration officials.

Courtesy Wichita Public Library/GLMV Architects

A state-of-the-art new central library is coming to downtown Wichita.

City Council gave final approval Tuesday for the $37 million dollar project to be built near the corner of 2nd Street and McLean.

Andy Marso / Heartland Health Monitor

Medicaid applications are piling up in Topeka because of problems with a new computer system, which are also causing some Kansans to lose their coverage.

Bloomsberries, flickr Creative Commons

Court-appointed lawyers in Kansas say they need more money to defend high-profile murder cases, like the Carr brothers from Wichita.

The U.S. Supreme Court recently upheld the death penalty sentences handed down in that case and in another Kansas murder case. Because of the ruling, court-appointed attorneys will have to continue working on those cases, and that will take more money. 

Stephen Koranda / KPR

A bill before a Kansas House committee would allow the state to deny financial assistance for some school district building projects.

Under the current system, school districts issue bonds for improvement projects and the state helps pick up the tab. The proposal would create a state board that would determine if school district building projects are directly related to instruction. If they aren’t, the board can cut back or eliminate state support.

Pictoscribe, flickr Creative Commons

The City of Wichita begins it 2016 water rebate program on Monday. Water customers may receive some cash back for purchases that are easy on the water supply.

High-efficiency washing machines, dishwashers and toilets that use less water will qualify for the rebate and can earn their owner a $100 bonus from the city. In addition to those items, prospective recipients can report smart controllers for irrigation and sensors that detect rain and turn off automatic irrigation for the same amount.

Those who have bought a rain barrel can also apply for a rebate up to $75.

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