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Last week’s general election was the first local one held in the fall. The change from spring elections gives newly elected Wichita City Council officials more time to prepare before they enter office.

Outgoing Councilwoman Lavonta Williams says that in the past, local elections were an “immediate transaction”: officials were elected one week, and sworn in the next.

Now, though, incoming members of the council have close to two months to prepare for their new jobs.

Dan Skinner / Kansas Public Radio/File photo

A new report in the Kansas City Star is once again raising concerns about a lack of transparency in Kansas state government.

Brian Grimmett/KMUW

The Great Plains United Methodist Conference will be holding an active shooter training in Wichita next month. It's in response to the many questions they've been receiving after the recent church shooting in Sutherland Springs, Texas.

Peggy Lowe / Harvest Public Media

On a feedlot in far southwest Kansas, two cowboys on horseback move cattle on the high dusty plains, spread out like dozens of football fields stitched together with miles of fences. Their “Buenos dias! Buenos dias!” greetings mix with moos on a hot summer morning.

They’re two of the 400 employees who work on the feedlot, which is one of the largest in the U.S. in a state that ranks third in meat production.

U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

Saltwater injection. Fracking. Enhanced oil recovery.

News of protests in recent months against oil- and gas-related activity in the Flint Hills has drawn fresh attention to these and other terms — as well as some confusion.

COURTESY SUNFLOWER FOUNDATION

Progressives deride supporters of President Donald Trump as willfully ignorant reactionaries, even racists.

Fans of the president respond in kind, dismissing liberals as snowflakes and worse.

The escalating war of words is a clear and present danger to American democracy, said Carolyn Lukensmeyer, executive director of the National Institute for Civil Discourse, in a presentation sponsored by the Topeka-based Sunflower Foundation’s Advocacy in Health speaker series.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

It took election workers about an hour Friday to count the 122 ballots that trickled in on and after Tuesday’s election.

Stephan Bisaha / KMUW

After months of searching, Inter-Faith Ministries has found a distribution center for Operation Holiday in Towne West Square.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

Incoming Wichita City Council representative Brandon Johnson will be the youngest on the board by more than a decade.

Johnson won the race for the District 1 seat with about 65 percent of the vote. Speaking to supporters on election night, he reflected on the importance of engaging young residents.

"It’s about working together, bridging gaps," he said. "Age gaps, gender gaps."

The 31-year old community activist said as a council member, he wants to make sure everyone has a voice.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas News Service/File photo

The Kansas Supreme Court is divided over whether a law requiring criminal offenders to register with local authorities after prison represents extra punishment.

A 4-3 majority has concluded that registration for sex, drug and violent offenders is not extra punishment. Its latest decision came Thursday in the appeal of Djuan Richardson.

He was convicted of selling cocaine in Sedgwick County in 2003 and pleaded guilty to violating the offender registration law in 2011. He later sought unsuccessfully to withdraw that plea.

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