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kscourts.org

One of the longest-serving members of the Kansas Supreme Court has died. Former Chief Justice Kay McFarland died Tuesday.

McFarland was the first woman to serve on the state's highest court and the first female chief justice in Kansas.

McFarland graduated from Washburn Law School where she was the only woman attending classes full time. She was the first woman elected as a Shawnee County district judge in 1972 and was appointed to the Kansas Supreme Court in 1977.

David Wolff - Patrick/Redferns via Getty Images

Nearly 50 years into life as a professional musician, Peter Frampton is still uncovering new facets of his playing and his music. This summer he’s been criss-crossing the country performing live dates to packed houses with his electrifying brand of rock music, but during his downtime from the road he’s been preparing for his first-ever acoustic album.

Ty Nigh, flickr Creative Commons

The city of Wichita approved a Capital Improvement Program Tuesday afternoon that accounts for $1.9 billion in potential spending.

The Capital Improvement Program is meant to prioritize city projects for the next decade. While the funding isn’t guaranteed, it’s used as a wish list of sorts for improving Wichita. It includes millions of dollars for parks, water and sewer improvements, bike paths and public safety. But the plan’s main focus is improving streets and highways.

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Updated at 3:21pm:

A Wichita man had no anti-abortion motives when he brought a small homemade explosive device into a women's health clinic while applying for a job, police said Tuesday. The 19-year-old was homeless and carrying everything he owned in his backpack when he went to the South Wind Women's Center for a Monday interview, Wichita police spokesman James Espinoza said.

Archives.gov

Today marks the 95th anniversary of the vote that gave women full voting rights in national and state elections.

The 19th Amendment to the Constitution was not an easy victory for the tens of thousands of women involved in the suffrage movement.

The women’s suffrage movement had been waging a battle for equal voting rights for more than 70 years leading up to that crucial vote on Aug.18, 1920.

The ratification vote came down to one vote, from one state: Tennessee.

Wichita Area Technical College

Wichita Area Technical College’s aviation training received a boost Monday morning from a major equipment donation and a workforce training grant.

The Kansas Department of Commerce provided a $183,000 grant to Wichita Area Technical College to cover the tuition and training for 70 sheet metal workers.

Spirit AeroSystems is looking to hire up to 500 sheet metal workers but is having a hard time finding qualified candidates.

Michael B. / flickr Creative Commons

Dozens of Kansas school districts will be asking lawmakers for extra state funding next week because they have more students or falling property values.

Monday is the deadline to apply, and the total number of schools asking for funding could be around 40.

Kansas moved to a block grant system this school year, and it doesn’t automatically add additional funding when student enrollment grows.

N A I T, flickr Creative Commons

Staffing shortages at the Hutchinson Correctional Facility have resulted in the end of a partnership allowing inmates to train service dogs.

The correctional facility has worked with Canine Assistance Rehabilitation Education and Services, or CARES, since 2009. Since then, 125 inmates have been involved in the basic training of 245 service dogs.

The prison had one full-time officer overseeing the program, but because of an on-going hiring shortage that officer is now in a security job.

healthcare.gov

This year's open enrollment for health insurance through the federal marketplace ended February 15th, and the 2016 sign-up period doesn't open until November first. But as Heartland Health Monitor's Bryan Thompson explains, thousands of Kansans have been able to sign up in the last six months anyway.

That's because of what the government refers to as special enrollment periods. They're based on the notion that life can change, so enrollment needs to be flexible.

Dave Ranney file photo / KHI News

The president of the Kansas Hospital Association is taking issue with recent comments made by Gov. Sam Brownback about Medicaid expansion.

The governor said rather than lobbying for expansion, hospitals should address their financial problems by innovating and getting more efficient. He said reductions in Medicare payments triggered by the Affordable Care Act are the biggest problem for Kansas hospitals.

But hospital association president Tom Bell says the governor is wrong about that.

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