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Dave Ranney, Heartland Health Monitor

Douglas County District Court Judge Peggy Carr Kittel is raising questions about possible changes to the state’s foster care program. As Heartland Health Monitor’s Jim McLean reports, the judge is concerned the state may soon require foster-care couples to be married.

Judge Kittel outlined her concerns in a letter to officials at the Kansas Department of Children and Families. She says requiring all couples providing foster to marry would reduce the number of foster homes at a time when there are near record numbers of children in the system.

Stephen Melkisethian, flickr Creative Commons

This piece originally aired July 15, 2015, during All Things Considered.

A peaceful vigil to remember the nine church members gunned down in South Carolina and to promote gun safety will be held in Wichita’s Old Town Friday.

The Rising for Charleston vigil will take place one month after the massacre where nine African Americans were murdered in a South Carolina African Methodist Episcopal church. Victims will be honored with the ringing of a bell and the recitation of their names.

Alberto G., flickr Creative Commons

The Kansas State Board of Education is working to rewrite the rules for evaluating student test scores. Kansas revamped standardized tests last year, and board members are working this summer to update the so-called “cut scores.”

Kansas Board of Education member Deena Horst says they should be setting high goals for students to be considered proficient.

“We want our students to be able to run with the best, if not be the best,” Horst says.

Courtesy photo

    

Some years ago Rob Kapilow finished graduate school, walked into a teaching gig at Yale, and started conducting the university’s symphony orchestra. At 23 he considered himself rich beyond his imagination--until a few years later when he traveled to Broadway to conduct in musical theatre. As a click bait headline might read, he couldn’t believe what happened next.

Virginia Guard Public Affairs, flickr Creative Commons

According to a report issued Wednesday by a group of retired military leaders, the nation’s obesity epidemic is causing significant recruiting problems for the Department of Defense. One in three young Americans is too overweight to enlist.

http://centralplainshealthcarepartnership.org

The Sedgwick County Commissioners voted Wednesday to restore some of the funding they cut from Project Access earlier this year.

The nonprofit coordinates donated medical care for uninsured patients.

The county will provide an additional $25,000 to Project Access this year, bringing the county’s contribution to the program up to $200,000.

In January, the commissioners unexpectedly cut the program’s funding, even though it was already approved in the county’s budget.

Carla Eckels

An earlier version of this piece originally aired July 14, 2015, during All Things Considered.

The fate of several of Wichita's swimming pools will be decided with the help of local residents.

The city will decide how to spend $18 million on its aquatics plan over the next decade. The money comes from its Capital Improvement Program fund.

Sam Zeff/KCUR

The Kansas State Board of Education today heard about the increasing number of teacher leaving the state to teach elsewhere.

In the past five years the number of teachers moving out of state to teach has ballooned from 400 to over 650, a 63 percent increase.

The report also said that the number of teachers simply leaving the profession almost doubled since 2011.

Marie Carter, personnel manager for the Topeka School District, says the political climate in Kansas is to blame.

Amy Delamaide, flickr Creative Commons

The Wichita City Council is holding annual budget talks, and while officials have been happy to announce that the budget is balanced and few cuts have been made, the future of the city’s bus system is still undecided. 

 

City Manager Robert Layton presented the 2016-2017 proposed budget to City Council members Tuesday morning.

Michael B. / flickr Creative Commons

The Kansas State Board of Education has narrowly approved a plan that would loosen some teaching requirements for six Kansas school districts. The 6-4 vote will allow the districts to hire people who have expertise in a subject but who lack a teaching license.

Supporters of the change include Kansas City, Kansas, Public Schools Superintendent Cynthia Lane, who says this will give administrators more flexibility in hiring for hard-to-fill teacher openings.

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