Opinion
2:52 pm
Wed May 30, 2012

The Word 'Hopefully' Is Here To Stay, Hopefully

thousands of NPR stories." href="/post/word-hopefully-here-stay-hopefully" class="noexit lightbox">
The word "hopefully" has been used in thousands of NPR stories.
Stephanie d'Otreppe/NPR

Geoff Nunberg, the linguist contributor on NPR's Fresh Air, is the author of the book The Years of Talking Dangerously.

There was something anticlimactic to the news that the AP Stylebook will no longer be objecting to the use of "hopefully" as a floating sentence adverb, as in, "Hopefully, the Giants will win the division." It was like seeing an obituary for someone you assumed must have died around the time that Hootenanny went off the air.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:50 pm
Wed May 30, 2012

As Big Employers Pinch Pennies, Health Savings Accounts Take Off

As employers look to cut spending on health, more workers are being steered to health plans with high deductibles.
iStockphoto.com

Feel like you're paying more out of pocket for medical expenses? You've got company, according to the latest data from health insurers.

Enrollment in health savings accounts grew 18 percent last year as employers continued to steer workers into high-deductible medical plans, an insurance group said this morning.

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History
2:46 pm
Wed May 30, 2012

Kafka's Final Absurdist Tale Plays Out In Tel Aviv

Franz Kafka (shown here circa 1905) is considered one of the 20th century's most influential writers. Before his death in 1924, he had published only short stories and a single novella, The Metamorphosis.
Imagno Getty Image

Originally published on Sun June 3, 2012 7:31 am

Franz Kafka published just a few short stories and a novella during his lifetime, yet he was considered one of the 20th century's most influential writers.

The rest of his work was largely kept secret, and literary scholars have long wondered what gems they might find among Kafka's papers.

The answer may ultimately lie on Tel Aviv's Spinoza Street, inside a small, squat apartment building covered with dirty, pinkish stucco that looks like it's seen better days.

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American Dreams: Then And Now
2:31 pm
Wed May 30, 2012

With The American Dream Comes The Nightmare

Unemployed circus clown Tim Torkildson, aka Dusty the Clown, sits on a bench on the north side of the U.S. Capitol in May.
Bill Clark CQ Roll Call

Originally published on Mon August 6, 2012 10:34 am

One American's dream can be another American's nightmare.

Consider: Some people long to live in big cities; others think cities have ruined the landscape. Some Americans love to drive big old honking SUVs; others see huge cars as pollution-producing monsters. For some people, the American dream is a steady office job. For others, the office is a sinkhole and the real dream is freedom from the office.

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Planet Money
2:22 pm
Wed May 30, 2012

What Air Traffic Can Teach Us About Kidney Transplants

Waiting their turn.
David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 3:11 pm

This is the second of two stories we're doing this week on organ transplants. See the first story, Who Decides Whether This 26-Year-Old Woman Gets A Lung Transplant?

Nikolaos Trichakis is a Harvard Business School professor who studies air traffic. He was watching the news one night when a segment came on about the waiting list for kidney transplants.

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The Salt
1:48 pm
Wed May 30, 2012

Food Trucks Draw Hungry Kids For Free Summer Meals

New Haven Public Schools' summer food truck will deliver an expected 40,000 free meals to kids in eligible neighborhoods during July and August.
Timothy Cipriano New Haven Public Schools

For millions of American children, the end of the school year means the end of free and reduced-price lunches that fill the gap between their appetites and their families' budgets. It's not that meals aren't available during the summer – they generally are, thanks to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Summer Food Service Program. But getting kids to show up for those meals is harder than you'd think.

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The Two-Way
1:47 pm
Wed May 30, 2012

Pakistani Court Did Not Connect Doctor's Conviction To Bin Laden Hunt

The Pakistani doctor who American officials say was recruited by the CIA to help in the hunt for Osama bin Laden, and has since been sentenced to 33 years in prison, was convicted of having ties to a banned militant group, not for alleged treason.

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The Two-Way
1:30 pm
Wed May 30, 2012

New Mexico Wildfire Now Biggest In State History

A wildfire that has burned 265 square miles of the Gila National Forest in New Mexico is now burning across 170,000 acres. That makes it the biggest wildfire in state history.

As the AP reports, this fire eclipses a blaze last year that burned 159,593 acres in Las Conchas and threatened the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

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Remembrances
1:25 pm
Wed May 30, 2012

Remembering Doc Watson With 'Tennessee Stud'

Legendary folk singer and guitarist Doc Watson died on Tuesday, at the age of 89. Long considered one of America's greatest musicians, Watson was blind from the age of one, and taught himself to play music. NPR's Neal Conan remembers the life and career of Doc Watson with a song: "Tennessee Stud."

Politics
1:24 pm
Wed May 30, 2012

Texas Vote Boosts Romney Amid 'Birther' Revival

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Romney rings up the magic number, Barrett and Walker wind up in Wisconsin, and on CNN, the Donald brings up the birther business again. It's Wednesday and time for a...

DONALD TRUMP: Ridiculous...

CONAN: ...edition of the Political Junkie.

PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN: There you go again.

VICE PRESIDENT WALTER MONDALE: When I hear your new ideas, I'm reminded of that ad: Where's the beef?

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