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5:11 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Computer's Screen Inspired First Video Game, 'Space War'

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

We've been talking occasionally with inventors about what inspired their creations. Today, a computer scientist in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Fifty-one years ago, one of the first digital video games was born out of his imagination.

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The Two-Way
4:58 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Pioneering Native American Leader Marge Anderson Dies

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 10:01 am

The first woman to lead a Minnesota Indian tribe has died. Marge Anderson led efforts to secure tribal hunting and fishing rights on Lake Mille Lacs. She died Saturday at age 81 of natural causes at the Mille Lacs Reservation in Onamia, Minn.

The Minneapolis Star Tribune reports:

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U.S.
4:55 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

How Firefighters Cope With Profound Tragedy

Members of the Prescott fire department embrace Monday as they arrive to listen in at a news conference in Prescott, Ariz.
Julie Jacobson AP

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 6:15 pm

It's not that firefighters are never afraid, but they have too many other things to worry about to give in to fear.

Especially the elite wildland crews known as hotshots.

"Fear is not an aspect of the job, per se," says David Simpson, superintendent of the hotshot crew based in Santa Fe, N.M. "It's the day-to-day tasks you perform time and time again that concern us more than the fire changing directions."

There are about 100 hotshot crews in the U.S. Working in teams of 20, they are the ones who hack out a fire line in hopes of containing a raging brush fire.

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Shots - Health News
4:39 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Guidelines Aim To Clear Confusion Over Ear Tubes For Kids

You can probably chuck those ear plugs and enjoy the pool.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 7:28 am

Doctors have been putting in a lot of ear tubes. It's the most common outpatient surgery in children.

Despite how common the tubes are, it's been hard for parents to know if and when a child should get them. "Pediatricians are confused about it too," says Dr. Richard Rosenfeld, chairman of otolaryngology at SUNY Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn, N.Y. "And ENT doctors."

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The Two-Way
3:28 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Jury Acquits Man Who Wrote On Sidewalk With Chalk

Sidewalk chalk: A jury ruled Monday they aren't the tools of a criminal.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 5:03 am

Jeffrey Olson faced 13 years in jail for writing on a sidewalk with chalk. But a San Diego jury of two men and 10 women found him not guilty of criminal vandalism.

Olson, 40, was charged with 13 counts of vandalism for expressing his opinions on sidewalks outside three Bank of America branches. His messages, according to Gawker, included:

— "No Thanks, Big Banks"

— "Shame on Bank of America"

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The Two-Way
3:15 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

The ZIP Code Turns 50 Today — Here Are 9 That Stand Out

Each black dot represents the geometric center of a ZIP code.
Matt Stiles U.S. Census Bureau

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 6:50 pm

Today marks the 50th anniversary of the Zone Improvement Plan, the network of ZIP codes we use for everything from mail delivery to credit card security.

The U.S. Postal Service began using the five-digit codes on July 1, 1963, hoping they would improve the efficiency and speed of mail sorting. Since then, the codes have assumed a role in the identities of many Americans, helping to define where they live or work.

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The Two-Way
3:04 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Calif. Judge Rules Yoga In Public Schools Not Religious

Third-graders at Olivenhain Pioneer Elementary School in Encinitas, Calif., perform chair pose with instructor Kristen McCloskey in December 2012.
Kyla Calvert for NPR

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 3:39 pm

Earlier this year, we told you about some parents in the San Diego area who were suing the Encinitas Union School District to stop yoga classes because they believed the ancient Indian practice had religious overtones. Well, today we have a decision in that case: A judge ruled that the school district was not teaching religion when it offered elementary school students yoga classes.

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Movie Reviews
3:00 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Branagh Imagines Mozart's 'Magic Flute' In Wartime

Pamina (Amy Carson) and Tamino (Joseph Kaiser) in Kenneth Branagh's production of Mozart's The Magic Flute.
Revolver Group

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 3:41 pm

Mozart's The Magic Flute, the last opera he lived to complete, has some of his most sublime and sublimely comic music. Technically, it's more of a musical comedy, what in German is called a Singspiel, a play with songs and spoken dialogue. I was excited to learn that it was filmed by Kenneth Branagh, whose Shakespeare movies I really admire. Mozart's mixture of fairy tale and high morality presents a great opportunity for a filmmaker; in 1975, Ingmar Bergman released a version for Swedish television that has become a beloved classic.

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Parallels
2:54 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

In A Rough Neighborhood, Jordan Clings To Its Stability

Jordanian protesters chant slogans against corruption during a March 15 anti-government demonstration in Amman. Jordanians have held Arab Spring-inspired protests since 2011, demanding political reforms and anti-corruption measures. The protests have been peaceful.
Khalil Mazraawi AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 1:19 am

Across the turbulent Middle East, Arab revolts have toppled dictators and strongmen. Jordan remains stable for now but the pressure is mounting.

The Syrian war rages right next door, sending a flood of refugees across the border that has strained every resource in the kingdom.

Jordan shares the region's troubles: a faltering economy; rampant unemployment, especially among the young; and a popular demand for a say in how the country is governed.

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The Two-Way
2:29 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Top Vatican Bank Officials Resign

Ernst von Freyberg, president of the Vatican Bank Institute for Works of Religion, or IOR, talks with The Associated Press during an interview June 10 at his office in Vatican City. He was named the bank's interim director on Monday after the director and the deputy director both resigned.
Domenico Stinellis AP

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 7:42 pm

Two top officials of the Vatican bank resigned Monday just days following the arrest of a senior cleric with ties to the institution after police caught him with the equivalent of about $26 million in cash that they say he was trying to bring into Italy from Switzerland.

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