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The Two-Way
7:34 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Philippine Navy Still Hopes For Survivors From Ferry Crash

A relative of one of the missing passengers writes down contact numbers on Sunday at the office of the ferry involved in a collision, in Cebu City.
Ted Aljibe AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 4:15 pm

Divers in the Philippines are making scant progress in their efforts to recover survivors — or bodies — from the scene where a ferry sank after colliding with a cargo ship near the central port city of Cebu.

About 35 people have been confirmed dead from MV Thomas Aquinas, which was carrying more than 800 passengers when it was struck late Friday and then sank within minutes.

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The Two-Way
7:07 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Egypt Tense After Bloody Crackdown On Protests

Mourners attend the funeral of Ammar Badie, son of the Muslim Brotherhood's Supreme Guide, at the Katameya cemetery in the New Cairo district on Sunday. Badie was killed in clashes with security forces.
Ed Giles Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 12:51 am

This post was updated 1:00 a.m. ET Monday

The Egyptian government says at least 36 people were killed Sunday — Islamists who had been in custody of security forces, according to a report in The New York Times.

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Middle East
5:41 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Cairo Mosque Is A Protest Flashpoint

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 3:07 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. At least 800 people have been killed in Egypt since the ouster of President Mohamed Morsi last month and the subsequent protests launched by his supporters. Yesterday, a Cairo mosque was the scene of a struggle between police and soldiers and Morsi supporters who had taken shelter there.

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Middle East
4:29 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Obama Struggles To Find Effective Egypt Policy

President Obama delivers a statement on Egypt at his vacation home on Martha's Vineyard on Thursday.
Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 6:00 pm

The Obama administration is in a difficult situation with its Egypt policy.

President Obama, who often talks about free speech and human rights, has cancelled joint military exercises with Egypt but has stopped short of cutting off aid to the Egyptian military. As the violence continues in the streets of Cairo and other Egyptian cities, all sides seem unhappy with the U.S. approach.

In 2009, on his first trip to the Middle East as president, in the same year he won the Nobel Peace Prize, Obama spoke of a new approach to relations with the Islamic world.

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Parallels
4:29 am
Sun August 18, 2013

What's Next For Egypt: 3 Scenarios

Supporters of the deposed Egyptian president, Mohammed Morsi, carry an injured demonstrator who was shot during clashes in Ramses Square in Cairo on Friday. Dozens were killed nationwide in escalating violence.
AMR ABDALLAH DALSH Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 11:27 am

For two years, the conversation on Egypt centered on how to build a democracy. Suddenly the discussion has turned much darker, with some wondering aloud whether the largest Arab nation is hurtling toward civil war.

The bloody crackdown by Egypt's security forces has raised the specter of a protracted conflict pitting the military against the Muslim Brotherhood, the country's most powerful political force.

Egypt's escalating crisis is far too volatile for any declarative statements, analysts say. But here are three possible scenarios that could play out:

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Author Interviews
4:57 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

What Drove Wild West's Jesse James To Become An Outlaw?

Jesse James, seen here in his 1874 wedding portrait, fought in the American Civil War before he formed a gang and started robbing banks.
AP

Tales of Jesse James's exploits have grown to almost mythological proportions since the actual man and his gang galloped over the plains stealing horses, holding up trains, and robbing banks in the years after the Civil War. Shot All To Hell: Jesse James, The Northfield Raid, and the Wild West's Greatest Escape is a new book about the legendary man.

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All Tech Considered
4:13 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Cracking The Code: Just How Does Encrypted Email Work?

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat August 17, 2013 4:47 pm

If the past few months have taught us anything, it's that everything we do online leaves a digital trail. While it may seem like there's not much we can do about it, there are some tech companies that are working to obscure that trail a little bit, with a process known as encryption.

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It's All Politics
4:13 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Amid Struggle For 'Soul' Of GOP, Libertarians Take Limelight

Rep. Justin Amash of Michigan, a libertarian Republican, says recent surveillance leaks have "brought home" libertarian ideas.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 7:16 am

"There is no question that there is a civil war that is waging within the party."

That Republican conflict, political science professor David Cohen adds, isn't between just two sides, but among a number of factions, including libertarians.

One of the most public battles has involved national security and civil liberties. Leaks about the National Security Agency's surveillance programs raised alarms for libertarians about the government's reach.

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Music Interviews
4:13 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Irene Diaz: Crafting Songs In Dreamy Black And White

Irene Diaz's debut EP is titled I Love You Madly.
Miguel Morales Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat August 17, 2013 8:50 pm

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The Two-Way
3:58 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

K.C. Royals' Miguel Tejada Suspended 105 Games For Drug Use

Royals infielder Miguel Tejada celebrates an RBI single against the Boston Red Sox last week at Kauffman Stadium in Kansas City, Mo.
Ed Zurga Getty Images

Originally published on Sat August 17, 2013 7:47 pm

Kansas City Royals infielder Miguel Tejada has been suspended by order of the commissioner of baseball after he was found to be in violation of Major League Baseball's drug program.

Marc Garber of member station WNYC says Tejada, 39, will get a 105-game suspension — one of the longest in major league history — after he reportedly tested positive on multiple occasions for Adderall, an amphetamine used to treat attention-deficit disorder.

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