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The Two-Way
7:10 am
Wed March 6, 2013

After Chávez: His 'Revolution' Is Likely To Continue

Supporters of Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez gathered late Tuesday at Bolivar Square in Caracas, Venezuela, to mourn him.
David Fernandez EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 10:29 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': Steve Inskeep speaks with journalist Jon Lee Anderson
  • From 'Morning Edition': Juan Forero speaks with Renee Montagne

Venezuelan Vice President Nicolás Maduro "controls the purse strings" and his opponents have been looking weak, NPR's Juan Forero said earlier today on Morning Edition.

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Business
6:48 am
Wed March 6, 2013

E.U. Hits Microsoft With $732 Million Fine

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 10:18 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR business news starts with a big fine for Microsoft.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

The Two-Way
6:38 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Book News: 'Superman' Artist Quits Amid Uproar Over Author's Views On Homosexuality

Orson Scott Card, the Ender's Game author tapped to work on an upcoming issue of DC Comics' "Adventures of Superman," has referred to homosexuality as "deviant behavior."
Mark Dadswell Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Africa
6:25 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Hot Coffee Thwarts Robbery Attempt

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 2:18 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. This story starts as a business transaction in West Haven, Connecticut. A man ordered coffee at a drive-thru Dunkin Donuts. Then, according to NBC Connecticut, he announced a robbery and tried to climb through the window. Luckily, his hot coffee was ready so the clerk threw it in his face. She followed that with a whole pot. The man fled and the clerk recalled the Dunkin Donuts slogan: Go run on Dunkin, she called after him. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
6:21 am
Wed March 6, 2013

In China, Baby's Brutal Death Raises Questions For Many About Nation's Values

Baby Haobo. For many netizens in China, this pixelated image of the infant who suffered a grisly death is a stark reminder of disturbing changes in the country's values system. The picture has spread quickly across Chinese websites.
Tencent

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 12:08 pm

A tale of two car thefts has transfixed China, sparking a new bout of soul-searching. It's generated far more attention online than the ongoing legislative session in Beijing, despite leaked orders from the local government restricting official coverage.

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Kitchen Window
5:45 am
Wed March 6, 2013

The Caraway Seed Is A Spice Worth Meeting

Domenica Marchetti for NPR

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 11:42 am

I've always thought caraway to be an underappreciated spice. It holds none of the historical significance of cinnamon, cloves, pepper or other prized spices that for centuries drove commerce among Asia, Africa and Europe (and that ultimately led to the discovery of the Americas).

In flavor, it lacks the Mediterranean perfume of its cousin fennel or the allure of cumin, another close relative. Its aroma is sharp and slightly aggressive, and if you bite into a seed on its own, there is, at first, a certain soapiness to its flavor.

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Europe
5:41 am
Wed March 6, 2013

German Man Caught Impersonating A Cardinal

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 10:18 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

The world is speculating, furiously, about who will be the next pope. The wait was too much for one German man, who tried to sneak into a closed-door meeting of cardinals by impersonating one. The man, calling himself Basilius was spotted and thrown out by the Swiss Guard, after someone noticed his crucifix was too short and his sash was just a purple scarf. He claimed to be from the Italian Orthodox Church - which does not exist.

Around the Nation
3:45 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Chicago Commuters Brace For Delays During Bridge Repair

Construction on Chicago's Wells Street Bridge is taking place around the clock, as crews replace the south leaf section. The north leaf section will be replaced in the spring. The double-decked steel truss drawbridge was built in 1922.
David Schaper NPR

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 10:18 am

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NPR Story
3:39 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Business News

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 10:18 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR business news starts with markets on fire.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

NPR Story
3:39 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Chavez's Death Will Have Ramifications For Cuba

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 10:18 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The death of Hugo Chavez could mean as much for Cuba as it will for Venezuela. As we just heard, Chavez looked to Fidel Castro for inspiration, and Castro has supplied Venezuela with thousands of Cuban doctors, health workers and security specialists. In return, Chavez sent a massive amount of Venezuelan oil to Cuba at cut-rate prices, and thus helped keep the Cuban economy afloat during years of crisis.

Joining us now is NPR's Tom Gjelten. Good morning.

TOM GJELTEN, BYLINE: Good morning, Renee.

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