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The Two-Way
11:44 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Minneapolis Renames Columbus Day As Indigenous People's Day

Columbus Day will be designated as Indigenous Peoples Day in Minneapolis, which has become one of several U.S. cities to make the change. Here, a member of the Cowichan Tribes holds her hand up in prayer during a 2011 Native American protest against Columbus Day in Seattle.
Elaine Thompson AP

Minneapolis has designated the second Monday of October, the federal Columbus Day holiday, as Indigenous Peoples Day. The city council adopted the plan after hearing concerns that hailing Columbus as the discoverer of America is inaccurate and ignores the history of indigenous people.

Last week, Indigenous Peoples Day supporter and Lakota activist Bill Means told Minnesota Public Radio that the story that Christopher Columbus discovered America was "one of the first lies we're told in public education."

He expanded on that idea Friday.

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Shots - Health News
11:00 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Giving Up On Its Obamacare Exchange No Cure For Oregon's Ills

Oregon was an early adopter of the Affordable Care Act, and ran a series of ads encouraging all Oregonians to sign up for health insurance. But their website never became fully functional.
Cover Oregon

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 5:45 pm

Oregon has been "all in" on health reform. Its embrace of the Affordable Care Act includes a very successful Medicaid expansion, a $2 billion federal experiment to show the state can save money by managing patients' care better, and, of course, the state's own online marketplace to sell Obamacare insurance.

But that last point has been a huge problem.

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Science
10:11 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Fossil Fans Get Their Dino-Fix Before Smithsonian Renovates

A cast of a Tyrannosaurus rex skull greets visitors as they enter the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History in Washington.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 5:45 pm

Huge lines of people, kids in tow, are waiting to get into the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, the world's second-most visited museum.

Right inside the lobby, a cast of the skull of the new Tyrannosaurus rex the museum just acquired is stopping visitors dead in their tracks.

"We wanted to get up here before the exhibit for the dinosaurs closed," says Crystal Epley, who took a three-hour trip from Broadway, Va., to bring her son, John.

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The Two-Way
10:08 am
Sun April 27, 2014

South Africa Celebrates 20 Years Of Democracy

People attend South Africa's Freedom Day celebrations in Pretoria, with the federal Union Building in the background Sunday. The day marks the end of the apartheid era, when all races went to the polls to vote in historic 1994 elections.
AP

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 10:45 am

President Jacob Zuma led Freedom Day celebrations in Pretoria Sunday, as South Africa marked the 20th anniversary of democratic rule. The nation held its first general elections in 1994, when voters sent Nelson Mandela to the presidency with a resounding win that helped the country distance itself from the scourge of apartheid.

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The Two-Way
9:08 am
Sun April 27, 2014

NRA Says It's Not Bothered By Gun Control Group's Protest

A man examines weapons in the exhibit hall at the 143rd NRA Annual Meetings and Exhibits at the Indiana Convention Center in Indianapolis.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 10:48 am

The National Rifle Association's national convention drew a counter-demonstration in Indianapolis this weekend, as advocates for gun control press their own agenda near the convention center hosting the event. An NRA official says the group has plenty of support.

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Interviews
9:03 am
Sun April 27, 2014

The Risk And Reward Of Monitoring Elections In The Middle East

Election officials count ballots under the scrutiny of monitors in Iraq in 2005. Les Campbell from the National Democratic Institute worked as an election monitor during Iraq's 2005 elections, a job that came with a flak jacket and security detail.
Sasa Kralj AP

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 5:45 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Iraq is suffering the worst spate of violence in many years — some say the worst since the height of the U.S. war in 2008. On Friday, dozens of people were killed at an election rally in Baghdad. This Wednesday, Iraqis will go to the polls in the first parliamentary election since the U.S. pulled combat troops out in 2011.

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The Two-Way
8:13 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Obama Discusses Racist Comments Attributed To Clippers Owner

President Obama speaks during a joint press conference in Malaysia's administrative capital in Putrajaya Sunday, where he was asked about racist comments attributed to Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling.
Mohd Rasfan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 2:05 pm

Calling racist statements that were allegedly made by Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling "incredibly offensive," President Obama says he is confident the NBA will resolve the controversy that erupted after an audio recording of the comments was aired this weekend.

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The Two-Way
7:11 am
Sun April 27, 2014

U.S. And Philippines Agree On 10-Year Military Plan

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 10:55 am

More American military troops and assets could soon be placed in the Philippines, in a new deal that seems aimed at counterbalancing China's growing influence. The deal is expected to be formalized Monday, as President Obama arrives in Manila on his trip to Asia.

For NPR's Newscast unit, Simone Orendain filed this report from Manila:

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Europe
7:03 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Colosseum Gets A Good 2,000-Year Scouring

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 5:45 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

For two millennia, the Colosseum in Rome has been collecting layers of dirt and grime. Finally, it's getting a top-to-bottom scrubbing. The Roman monument was, of course, the center of entertainment back in the day where people could go to catch a really good show, like a gladiator fight, mock naval battle, or public execution. Millions of tourists visit the amphitheater these days, but it's filthy, covered in black gunk from car pollution, damaged by earthquakes, and stripped of materials over the centuries.

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Iraq
7:03 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Violence In Iraq Mars Runup To Election

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 5:45 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. Iraq is suffering the worst spate of violence that country has seen in many years, some say the worst since the height of the U.S. war in 2008. On Friday, dozens of people were killed at an election rally in Baghdad.

This Wednesday, Iraqis go to the polls in the first parliamentary election since the U.S. pulled combat troops out in 2011. To hear more about the upcoming election, we're joined by Reuters Baghdad Bureau Chief, Ned Parker. Welcome to the program.

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