Aileen LeBlanc

News Director

Aileen LeBlanc is a journalist, producer and director whose work in television, film and public radio has earned more than 60 regional and national awards.

She is producer/director of the documentaries Dayton Codebreakers (nominated for 3 regional Emmys) and Who’s Minding the Planet? (nominated for a Regional Emmy). Her latest film, Take Us Home, about Ethiopian Jews, is now in the festival circuit and has won the World Cinema Documentary Film Editing Award from the Amsterdam Film Festival and Award of Merit from the Lucerne International Film Festival. The film has screened at the Pan African Film Festival and the Studio City Festival in LA and the Sheba Festival in New York. Other official selections include Denver, Philadelphia, Louisville, Palm Beach and Detroit.

LeBlanc’s work on other films includes the Oscar-nominated documentary “The Last Truck” and the Emmy-winning “Lion in the House.”

LeBlanc’s career in journalism includes two news director positions at WYSO and WHQR. Her national work has been featured on NPR, Voice of America, BBC, Monitor Radio, Pacifica and the CBC.

She was honored by the Dayton League of Women Voters with a “Making Democracy Work Award.” She was given the first place prize in documentary from Public Radio News Directors Inc. for a piece on loving and caring for a partner with Alzheimer's.

Ways to Connect

Jewlissa Frickey / Westar Energy

Environmental regulations and commitments to address global warming are certainly not on terra firma. The Trump administration has vowed to ease emissions controls for power plants and to get coal miners back to work.

The Jeffrey Energy Center, in St. Mary’s, Kansas, near Topeka, is one such coal-fired power plant.

Joe Gratz / flickr Creative Commons

Friday is an amnesty day for non-custodial parents who are in trouble for not paying child support on time. Sedgwick County residents will have the chance to make a payment and avoid prosecution.

Susan NYC / flickr

Kansas' attorney general is leading a nationwide push to identify elder abuse and find ways to help in the fight against the growing problem.

It's estimated that one out of every 10 elderly people who live at home in their later years will become a victim of abuse. Elder abuse can include physical abuse, neglect and financial abuse or exploitation.

It is a crime in Kansas to commit abuse on seniors which, by Attorney General Derek Schmidt's definition, includes anyone 65 and above. As of 2010, there were more than 40 million people over 65 in the U.S.

wikipedia.org

Next Monday, a swath of America will witness a total eclipse of the sun. Parts of Kansas are bracing for an influx of travelers who want to experience the event first hand. According to the Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT), there are some things to consider as you make plans.

KDOT recommends that travelers to the northeast corner of the state be mindful of the fact that the roads will be crowded, so take into account the extra time you need for your trip.

wstrachan1, flickr Creative Commons

A federal appeals court upheld a Nebraska law which requires picketers to stay 500 feet away from funerals. This is another step in the fight between the courts and the Westboro Baptist Church.

The Topeka-based Westboro Baptist Church protests funerals using anti-gay slur filled signs. The church believes that the U.S. is being punished by God for supporting homosexuality.

Tex Texin / flickr Creative Commons

The Kansas Bureau of Investigation released its crime index report for 2016 and overall, crime in the state is increasing.

Violent crimes such as murder, rape, robbery, aggravated assault and battery increased by 4.2 percent in the state over the past year. The 2015 numbers were already 11.2 percent higher than the year before that.

ers.usda.gov

Kansas Sen. Jerry Moran helped introduce a new bill aimed at giving relief to food deserts across the country.

Kansas Department of Transportations

There will be a new look for Kansas licenses and IDs. The program is part of the REAL ID Act passed by Congress in 2005.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach is trying to avoid testifying under oath in front on the American Civil Liberties Union. He was ordered to do so as part of a sentence in a lawsuit filed by the ACLU.

From the AP: 

Sean Sandefur / KMUW/File photo

Kansas continues to be one of the leading states in renewable energy, especially with wind power.

Kansas is the fifth state to have at least 5000 megawatts of wind power capacity installed. The state is behind California, Oklahoma, Iowa and Texas, which has a capacity of a whopping 21,000 megawatts.

Kansans get 30 percent of their power from wind and solar. California is at 16 percent.

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