Aileen LeBlanc

News Director

Aileen LeBlanc is a journalist, producer and director whose work in television, film and public radio has earned more than 60 regional and national awards.

She is producer/director of the documentaries Dayton Codebreakers (nominated for 3 regional Emmys) and Who’s Minding the Planet? (nominated for a Regional Emmy). Her latest film, Take Us Home, about Ethiopian Jews, is now in the festival circuit and has won the World Cinema Documentary Film Editing Award from the Amsterdam Film Festival and Award of Merit from the Lucerne International Film Festival. The film has screened at the Pan African Film Festival and the Studio City Festival in LA and the Sheba Festival in New York. Other official selections include Denver, Philadelphia, Louisville, Palm Beach and Detroit.

LeBlanc’s work on other films includes the Oscar-nominated documentary “The Last Truck” and the Emmy-winning “Lion in the House.”

LeBlanc’s career in journalism includes two news director positions at WYSO and WHQR. Her national work has been featured on NPR, Voice of America, BBC, Monitor Radio, Pacifica and the CBC.

She was honored by the Dayton League of Women Voters with a “Making Democracy Work Award.” She was given the first place prize in documentary from Public Radio News Directors Inc. for a piece on loving and caring for a partner with Alzheimer's.

Ways to Connect

Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment.

On Wednesday evening, there will be a screening of a documentary film which examines the history of one of Broadway and the cinema’s most popular shows ever, South Pacific. KMUW’s Aileen LeBlanc sat down with director Steven C. Smith to discuss his film “Passion, Prejudice and South Pacific.”

In 1949, post-war audiences saw a musical that was breathtaking in its scope. Soon after, the show’s songs burst onto the hit parade.

Aileen LeBlanc

The wild horses of the west are being managed by the federal government with 71 million tax dollars. Some people believe that the herds are growing too large and that the horses are over populating the western public lands, taking up resources that could be used for cattle, wildlife and recreation use. But extra feral horses can't be shot or slaughtered and few are adopted. So thousands are shipped to the Midwest for safekeeping on large ranches. KMUW's Aileen LeBlanc visited a herd of wild mustangs in the Flint Hills near Cassoday.

The social media policy adopted by the public university system in Kansas is still being debated. A work group assigned to review and recommend changes to the policy presented their revisions last week. KMUW’s Aileen LeBlanc has more...

http://www.kgs.ku.edu

James Clad is the former US Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense.

He is also an advisor to the Cambridge Energy Research Associates – a group which counsels governments, oil companies, utilities and others on the oil, and gas industries and global energy markets.

He was in Wichita recently to speak with the Committee on Foreign Relations and he sat down with KMUW News Director, Aileen LeBlanc to discuss hydraulic fracturing or “fracking."

Richard Ross

There are about 70,000 young people in juvenile detention centers or correctional faculties in the United States. Richard Ross spent the past seven years documenting the lives of American juveniles who have been housed in these facilities that treat, confine, punish, assist, and, occasionally, harm them. The culmination of this work is a project titled Juvenile in Justice at the Ulrich Museum of Art at Wichita State University.

Hugo Phan

He shot an arrow through the apple which was on his son’s head. It was a test of an archer’s loyalty. But the creation of the opera, William Tell, is a test of talent for the singers. KMUW’s Aileen LeBlanc reports.

It is a rare experience – not once in a lifetime – but once in a great while, that we get the opportunity to see a production of William Tell. It has an epic scale of staging, almost operatic; but it is the difficulty and complexity of the music which really puts it beyond the reach of many companies. Not for the Wichita Grand Opera. The WGO takes on William Tell!

Courtesy photo

The Ulrich Museum at Wichita State University has acquired a significant collection (125) fine art photographs by Kansas native, Gordon Parks.

Gordon Parks was born in Fort Scott Kansas in 1912. He was drawn to photography when he saw images of migrant workers in a magazine.

He became a photojournalist who concentrated on social issues such as race relations, poverty and civil rights. He also documented the career of Mohammed Ali, the work of Malcolm X, Adam Clayton Powell and Stokley Carmichael.

In December, the Kansas Board of Regents instituted a policy governing social media use for the six-university system in the state. The controversy over the sweeping policy and the possibility of first amendment issues has been heating up ever since. KMUW's Aileen LeBlanc has this report:  

BACKGROUND

Voice and opera students at WSU will have the opportunity to study with two international opera stars beginning this fall.

Samuel Ramey, a renowned and celebrated opera talent and the most recorded bass in history, and Alan Held, an international opera star and one of the leading bass-baritone singing actors today, will join Wichita State's music faculty.

As announced in a press release on Tuesday, Ramey will have a daily presence on campus throughout the year.

In 2009, Dr. George Tiller, one of the few doctors in the country who performed "late abortions," was killed at his church in Wichita. His killer, Scott Roeder, was convicted of first degree murder and is serving a life term. Now, his attorneys are appealing the case at the Kansas Supreme Court.

Pages