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The fight over a move by the Legislature to defund the Kansas judiciary's budget has now landed in the federal courts.

A court notice shows Kansas has moved the lawsuit filed by four judges to U.S. District Court in Topeka.

The attorney representing the judges said Monday he is confident that whether it is heard in state or federal court the measure defunding the courts would be found unconstitutional. No decision has been made on whether to oppose the venue change.

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Kansas has plans to reduce the insurance assistance for children of lower-income state workers next year and also allow those children to be enrolled in a federal health program.

The Topeka Capital-Journal reports workers who qualify will be able in 2016 to sign their children up for coverage through the federal Children's Health Insurance Program, CHIP. Prior to the federal Affordable Care Act state workers weren't allowed to sign up for CHIP. / Wikipedia

A Wichita attorney has announced plans to challenge Congressman Mike Pompeo next year.

The Topeka Capital-Journal reports Dan Giroux, a Democrat, made his announcement Thursday. Giroux said in a news release that the people of south-central Kansas need a representative who will stand up for them and "not special interests."

The state's new Commissioner of Education says schools need to become more focused on the student, not the system.

While Commissioner Randy Watson says that "sounds simple," he added that it is "extremely hard."

Watson spoke to a gathering Thursday of more than 100 school administrators and board members in Salina as part of a regional meeting of the Kansas Association of School Boards.

Kansas election officials are expected to begin removing the names of more than 31,000 prospective voters from their registration records Friday in line with the state's tough voter identification law, which requires applicants to prove their citizenship before casting a ballot.

Kansas Democrats expect to pick a longtime Wichita-area activist as their new state chairman this weekend after the resignation of a leader who suggested rebranding the party.

Prominent Democrats say Derby attorney Lee Kinch emerged quickly as the favored candidate for the job. The party's state committee plans to meet Saturday in Salina to select the new leader.

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A federal appeals court will not reconsider its decision that an abortion opponent must stand trial over a letter she sent to a Wichita doctor saying someone might place an explosive under the doctor's car.

The 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals rejected a move seeking either a rehearing by the three-judge appeals panel or by the full court.

In July, a panel ruled that the decision about whether anti-abortion activist Angel Dillard's letter constituted a "true threat" should be left to a jury.

Kansas regulators are expected to give final approval to a $78 million annual rate increase for the state's largest electric company.

The Kansas Corporation Commission was meeting Thursday to consider an order on Topeka-based Westar Energy's rates. The three-member commission last month endorsed an agreement involving the company, the commission's staff, a state consumer advocacy agency and some of Westar's largest customers.



The Kansas Court of Appeals is moving its proceedings to Kansas college and university campuses to commemorate the Sept. 17, 1787, signing of the U.S. Constitution.

Three-judge panels will hear cases Tuesday at Wichita State University, the University of Kansas and Kansas State University. After arguments, the audience will have a chance to ask general questions about the judicial process.

The rate of Kansas residents who are uninsured has dropped to 10.2 percent amid a national movement to increase health coverage.

The U.S. Census Bureau determined that about 12.3 percent of people in Kansas didn't have health insurance in 2013. The Topeka Capital-Journal reports that the new information indicates that about 57,000 fewer people were uninsured in 2014 compared to 2013.