Associated Press

The Associated Press is one of the largest and most trusted sources of independent newsgathering, supplying a steady stream of news to its members, international subscribers and commercial customers. AP is neither privately owned nor government-funded; instead, it's a not-for-profit news cooperative owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members.

Joe Gratz / flickr Creative Commons

One of the men charged with conspiring to use a weapon of mass destruction on a housing complex in Garden City has waived a detention hearing.

Gavin Wright, a 51-year-old man from Liberal, decided to pass on a detention hearing in the case and instead pleaded not guilty to the charge.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Legislative researchers have found that the bond debt in Kansas has more than tripled since the late 1990s.

A chart they created shows the debt level stands at more than $5 billion for the 2017 fiscal year, The Topeka Capital-Journal reported. From fiscal year 1997 to 2017, the total amount of bond debt increased by 336.4 percent, or $3.8 billion, according to the chart.

Kansas regulators are threatening to halt the $12.2 billion sale of Topeka-based Westar Energy to Great Plains Energy if they don't get details on cost savings and other information.

Kansas Corporation Commission took no action at a meeting Tuesday. But an order warned that if merger standards aren't met, possible action could include a request for dismissal of the merger application, The Topeka Capital-Journal reported.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

A federal judge has revived a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of a Kansas law requiring prospective voters to prove they are U.S. citizens.

U.S. District Judge Julie Robinson on Wednesday gave Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach a pass for failing to file a timely response to the lawsuit. She set aside a court clerk's default judgment issued last week against the state.

Robinson says the case is of constitutional significance and public interest, and that it deserves to be decided on the merits and not through procedural default.

Sedgwick County Sheriff's Office

Updated Monday, 3:30 p.m.:

The three men accused of plotting to attack Somali Muslim immigrants in Garden City made their first appearance in court Monday.

The defendants appeared before federal court Judge Gwynne Birzer at the U.S. Courthouse in downtown Wichita.

Curtis Allen, Gavin Wright and Patrick Stein are each charged with one count of conspiring to use a weapon of mass destruction. They were arrested last week in connection with an alleged plot to bomb a Garden City apartment complex that's home to Muslim immigrants from Somalia.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

Updated Saturday, 8:32 p.m.:

Federal prosecutors announced in Wichita on Friday charges related to what they say was a planned attack on Somali immigrants in the western Kansas meatpacking town of Garden City.

The Wichita Fire Department is asking residents to avoid low-lying, flood-prone areas including the Arkansas River and area creeks for the next several days. Saturated soil, due to recent and forecasted rains, may make these areas more prone to flooding.

Local Emergency Services have responded to dozens of submersions calls as a result of recent rains. Representatives say many of those calls were preventable if residents had avoided water covered roadways or heeded warning signs.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Democrats and voting rights advocates are ramping up voter registration drives across Kansas in the wake of recent court rulings allowing thousands of people to more easily register with a federal form or at motor vehicle offices without providing citizenship documents.

But the state's Republican Party contends those court cases are "practically irrelevant" to the November election.

GOP Executive Director Clay Barker says it isn't putting party emphasis on registration because its numbers are so high in Kansas and registration "tends to take care of itself."

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback has decided against proposing across-the-board cuts in state spending next year after his budget director asked agencies to propose 5 percent reductions and found some of the recommendations "harmful" to services.

Bloomsberries, flickr Creative Commons

A Kansas judge has ordered Secretary of State Kris Kobach to notify thousands of people who hadn't provided documents proving their citizenship that they will be allowed to vote for all offices in the November election.

Shawnee County District Judge Larry Hendrick's order affects more than 19,545 voters who registered at motor vehicle offices or with a federal form without providing documentary proof of U.S. citizenship.

The judge stopped short of issuing the permanent injunction sought by the American Civil Liberties Union. Kobach's office says it is reviewing the ruling.