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Nadya Faulx / KMUW/File photo

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach will not represent himself during the appeal of a voting rights case in which he was ordered to undergo more legal education and was twice found in contempt of court.

Julie Denesha / KCUR/File Photo

A court filing asserts Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach has complied with a court order finding the state's residents are not required to provide documentary proof of citizenship to register to vote.

Kobach told U.S. District Judge Julie Robinson there are no longer any registrations in suspense or cancelled for lack of citizenship documents.

The joint status report filed Sunday informs Robinson that Kobach is in full compliance with her order that all registrants receive the same information from county election offices and vote using the same poll books.

University of Arkansas

The University of Kansas will hire former Arkansas athletic director Jeff Long to lead its athletic department.

KU announced Thursday that Long will replace Sheahon Zenger, who was fired May 21. Zenger was KU's athletic director for nearly seven years. He received a $1.4 million severance package.

Long was athletic director at Arkansas from 2008 to 2017 before being fired last November amid criticism over the football team's performance. The Razorbacks, who also fired coach Brett Bielema, went 4-8 last season.

Dan Margolies / Kansas News Service, File photo

The ruling that struck down the state's proof-of-citizenship voter registration law leaves Kansas potentially on the hook to pay attorney's fees and costs for the winning side.

U.S. District Judge Julie Robinson granted Monday a joint request asking her to hold off awarding all fees and related expenses until appeals have been exhausted.

The parties contend a final amount will depend on the time spent on the appeal. It also notes attorneys are still verifying Secretary of State Kris Kobach's compliance with the latest ruling.

Hugo Phan / KMUW/File photo

A federal judge has set a fall trial date for two online gamers whose alleged dispute over video game bet ultimately led police to fatally shoot a Wichita man while responding to a hoax call.

U.S. District Judge Eric Melgren on Monday scheduled a Sept. 4 jury trial for 18-year-old Casey Viner of North College Hill, Ohio, and 19-year-old Shane Gaskill of Wichita. They are charged with conspiracy to obstruct justice, wire fraud and other counts.

MICHAEL COGHLAN / CREATIVE COMMONS-FLICKR

Inmates broke dozens of windows and set fires during a weekend disturbance at the maximum-security prison in El Dorado, the scene of other incidents last summer, officials said Monday.

Nobody was hurt in the fracas that started around noon Sunday in the prison's recreation yard and lasted about four hours, said Kansas Department of Corrections spokesman Samir Arif. Between 75 and 150 inmates were involved.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW/File photo

A federal judge has delayed the trial of a Sedgwick County commissioner accused of misspending more than $10,000 in campaign funds and trying to cover it up.

Kansas News Service/File photo

Secretary of State Kris Kobach unsuccessfully sought a governor's pardon for a corporate campaign donor's vice president whose crime, police said, involved threatening a cab driver by putting a gun to his head.

Kobach, a Republican and leading candidate for governor, approached then-GOP Gov. Sam Brownback's chief counsel about clemency for Kansas City-area resident Ryan Bader in August 2017, state records show. Kobach was Bader's attorney and initiated the pardon request three years after a state judge expunged the attempted robbery case from Bader's record.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio/File photo

Kansas has joined a multistate lawsuit challenging the legality of an immigration program that grants temporary legal status to immigrants without proper documents who came to the U.S. as children.

The program, called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, was established by former President Barack Obama in 2012. About 7,000 people in Kansas have obtained work permits under DACA.

Attorney General Derek Schmidt said Monday he joined the lawsuit last week at the request of Gov. Jeff Colyer.

Kansas News Service/File photo

Kansas consumer advocates are recommending state utility regulators reject Westar Energy's request for a $17.2 million rate increase and instead order the company to cut rates.

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