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Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

A Kansas Senate committee has endorsed a bill that would expand the state's Medicaid program to provide health coverage for 150,000 additional poor adults.

The bill approved Monday by the Public Health and Welfare Committee would expand Medicaid as encouraged by the 2010 federal Affordable Care Act championed by former President Barack Obama. The Medicaid program covers more than 370,000 poor, disabled and elderly Kansas residents.

Faces of Fracking / flickr Creative Commons

A Kansas House committee has rejected a bill that was designed to prevent earthquakes that experts say are caused by oil and gas production wastewater disposal methods.

Larry Darling, flickr Creative Commons

Kansas legislators see plenty of needs for spending across state government and are starting to complain that a court mandate puts schools first in line.

Prison staffing, state mental hospitals and highway projects are among the items lawmakers would like to fund. But an October state Supreme Court ruling that the $4 billion-plus the state spends on schools each year isn't adequate means that most conversations about money at the Statehouse revolve around schools.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW/File Photo

Secretary of State Kris Kobach is renewing a 14-year campaign to repeal a Kansas law granting in-state tuition rates to qualifying college students who aren't U.S. citizens.

The Kansas Department of Corrections has reassigned the superintendent of the state's juvenile corrections complex after he allegedly grabbed and shoved a female worker.

The agency announced Thursday that Kyle Rohr is reassigned to the central office until his criminal case is resolved. The Topeka city prosecutor's office said Rohr has been issued a citation on a charge of battery.

KOMUnews, flickr Creative Commons

Kansas legislators are overhauling the state's drunk driving laws to crack down on offenders and replace a defunct law that allowed police to compel suspects to blood alcohol testing.

The U.S. Supreme Court determined a warrantless breath test is permissible, but police would need to obtain a warrant to conduct a blood test.

Kansas News Service/File photo

The Kansas State Board of Education has approved an audit of how state funds are distributed to public schools following questions about the allocation of some dollars.

The Topeka Capital-Journal reports that the board accepted a recommendation Tuesday from Education Commissioner Randy Watson. The review is expected to start within two months and will examine whether funds are distributed in keeping with the state's school funding law.

Kansas Department of Transportations

Some Kansas residents are expressing frustration over the state's strict requirements for a new form of driver's license.

The licenses adopted by the state last year are intended to comply with the federal "Real ID" law. The law requires state-issued driver's licenses and identification cards to meet specific standards in order to be used for conducting official business with the government.

Kansas Health Institute/File photo

Top Kansas lawmakers expect to revise a broad confidentiality agreement that legislative interns must sign over concerns that it could discourage them from reporting misconduct.

The Kansas City Star reports that legislative leaders are reconsidering the confidentiality agreement after employment law attorneys warned that it could have a chilling effect on the willingness of interns to report sexual harassment or illegal activity.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW/File photo

Legal challenges to a Kansas law requiring proof of citizenship to register to vote are headed to trial next month.

U.S. District Judge Julie Robinson on Friday added additional days to a previously scheduled trial that begins March 6 in Kansas City, Kansas. The new schedule sets aside eight days for the bench trial.

American Civil Liberties Union sued Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach on behalf of the League of Women Voters and voters over the requirement that people produce a document such as a birth certificate or U.S. passport to register at motor vehicle offices.