Associated Press

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Nadya Faulx / KMUW

Election officials in Kansas are starting the process of registering thousands of suspended voters after a federal court ruled the state is violating the National Voter Registration Act. Approximately 18,000 people have been unable to vote in local or national elections because they failed to provide proof of citizenship while registering at a DMV.

The Kansas State Board of Education plans to discuss and take possible action on the Obama administration's directive that public schools allow transgender students to use restrooms that match their gender identity.

Christopher Sessums / flickr Creative Commons

Services for students with disabilities are among the many things Kansas education officials must solve amid the potential threat of school closures on July 1.

The state's Supreme Court ruled last month that the Legislature failed to adequately fund the state's poor public schools and gave the lawmakers until June 30 to address the issue. While many districts have cash reserves, the court's opinion said that without an acceptable state funding system, schools "will be unable to operate."

Cargill, Wikipedia Commons

Documents obtained by The Associated Press show that a deal to keep agribusiness giant Cargill operations in Wichita includes nearly $10 million in tax breaks over a 10-year period from state and local government entities.

The documents, which came from an open records request, show the incentive package includes tax abatements and sales tax exemptions from state, county, city and school district, but no outright cash incentives.

Wikipedia

The Kansas Bureau of Investigation is warning Kansans of a growing threat from a synthetic opioid that may have caused a number of overdose deaths in the past month.

The drug's name is U-47700 and was derived by the pharmaceutical firm Upjohn in the 1970s. The drug can be as potent as ten times that of a similar dose of morphine. The drug is not controlled in Kansas.

Axelboldt/Wikipedia public domain

Kansas will join legal action against a federal directive that public schools allow transgender students to use the bathroom that matches their gender identity.

Attorney General Derek Schmidt announced Wednesday that Kansas is challenging what he calls the Obama administration’s “unlawful efforts to unilaterally rewrite Title IX,” the 1972 federal law that bans discrimination in public schools on the basis of sex.

Updated Wednesday, 1:56 p.m.: Lawmakers dropped their push to try to pass a new school funding fix before the end of the 2016 session.

Original story:

Many Republican legislators are serious about defying a recent Kansas Supreme Court order on education funding and ready to test whether the justices would not allow public schools to open for the new academic year, the Senate's majority leader said Tuesday.

Stephen Koranda

Kansas Senate President Susan Wagle says lawmakers won't attempt this week to address the state Supreme Court's most recent ruling on education funding.

The Wichita Republican issued a statement Tuesday saying the state's attorneys have not had enough time to analyze the decision.

Lawmakers reconvene Wednesday to formally adjourn their annual session.

Wagle said she's consulted with Republican House Speaker Ray Merrick and GOP Gov. Sam Brownback about Friday's court decision and they've agreed on taking no action yet.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio

A top Kansas legislator circulated a letter Wednesday protesting the federal government's recent directive on accommodating transgender students in public schools and promising that lawmakers will "use every possible avenue" to resist it.

J. Schafer

Update from the AP:

A man accused of conspiring in a foiled plot to bomb a Kansas military base on behalf of the Islamic State group has pleaded guilty to conspiracy. Alexander E. Blair changed his plea to guilty on Monday in a Topeka federal court. Prosecutors say Blair helped 21-year-old John T. Booker in his plot to plant a 1,000-pound bomb at the Fort Riley military base to aid the Islamic State group. Blair admitted in court that he loaned Booker $100 to secure a storage space for the explosives and failed to inform law enforcement of the plot. Booker has already pleaded guilty in the case.

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