Associated Press

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Becky McCray / flickr Creative Commons

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach is planning to use provisional ballots during the upcoming elections and then throw out all of the votes for state and local races cast by the thousands of voters who register to vote at motor vehicle offices without providing proof of citizenship.

An email sent from Kobach's office to county election officials outlines the state's proposed plans for implementing a two-tiered election system in the wake of a federal court order requiring Kansas to allow these voters to cast ballots at least in the federal races.

Stephen Koranda File Photo

The Kansas Supreme Court is giving Gov. Sam Brownback until July 11 to tell the court why it shouldn't force him to fill a vacant district magistrate position.

The court on Tuesday ordered the governor to explain why he didn't make the appointment in 90 days, as required by state law.

Three 26th District judges filed a petition with the court last week after Brownback announced he would wait until after the August primaries to consider filling the vacancy, which was created when Judge Tommy Webb of Haskell County announced his retirement in February.

Dozens of central and western Kansas school superintendents say they have no intention of following U.S. Rep. Tim Huelskamp's advice to disregard a recent transgender bathroom directive from President Barack Obama's administration.

The Topeka Capital-Journal reached out to 129 school superintendents who were given the Republican congressman's letter and received responses from 30 of them.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas legislators hoped to settle on a proposed constitutional amendment Friday that would curb the power of the courts following a recent Supreme Court mandate to change the way public schools are funded.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

Election officials in Kansas are starting the process of registering thousands of suspended voters after a federal court ruled the state is violating the National Voter Registration Act. Approximately 18,000 people have been unable to vote in local or national elections because they failed to provide proof of citizenship while registering at a DMV.

The Kansas State Board of Education plans to discuss and take possible action on the Obama administration's directive that public schools allow transgender students to use restrooms that match their gender identity.

Christopher Sessums / flickr Creative Commons

Services for students with disabilities are among the many things Kansas education officials must solve amid the potential threat of school closures on July 1.

The state's Supreme Court ruled last month that the Legislature failed to adequately fund the state's poor public schools and gave the lawmakers until June 30 to address the issue. While many districts have cash reserves, the court's opinion said that without an acceptable state funding system, schools "will be unable to operate."

Cargill, Wikipedia Commons

Documents obtained by The Associated Press show that a deal to keep agribusiness giant Cargill operations in Wichita includes nearly $10 million in tax breaks over a 10-year period from state and local government entities.

The documents, which came from an open records request, show the incentive package includes tax abatements and sales tax exemptions from state, county, city and school district, but no outright cash incentives.

Wikipedia

The Kansas Bureau of Investigation is warning Kansans of a growing threat from a synthetic opioid that may have caused a number of overdose deaths in the past month.

The drug's name is U-47700 and was derived by the pharmaceutical firm Upjohn in the 1970s. The drug can be as potent as ten times that of a similar dose of morphine. The drug is not controlled in Kansas.

Axelboldt/Wikipedia public domain

Kansas will join legal action against a federal directive that public schools allow transgender students to use the bathroom that matches their gender identity.

Attorney General Derek Schmidt announced Wednesday that Kansas is challenging what he calls the Obama administration’s “unlawful efforts to unilaterally rewrite Title IX,” the 1972 federal law that bans discrimination in public schools on the basis of sex.

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