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A spokeswoman for Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback says the Republican is disappointed by a judge's decision to block a new state law that bans a specific abortion procedure.

The governor is a strong abortion opponent. His spokeswoman, Eileen Hawley, released a statement saying Brownback is committed to "supporting a culture of life."

Hawley called Kansas a "pro-life state" and said, "Kansas law should protect human dignity for all Kansans."

Stephen Koranda file photo

An advocacy group in Kansas is relieved that the U.S. Supreme Court has upheld a key part of the federal health care overhaul, but members of the state's congressional delegation say they'll still push for its repeal.

The high court on Thursday upheld health insurance subsidies for millions of consumers who purchased their coverage through a federal online marketplace. Kansas refused to set up its own exchange under the 2010 law.

Opponents of an Environmental Protection Agency proposal to reduce renewable fuel standards say the agency's indecision has slowed investment in the industry.

The EPA has proposed reducing the required volume of renewable fuels in the U.S. gasoline supply by 4 billion gallons this year and 5 billion gallons next year. The agency says Congress set the standards impossibly high in 2007 and they aren't being met.

Jeffrey Beall, flickr Creative Commons

This story originally aired June 24, 2015, during All Things Considered.

A religious liberty group says members of a Native American sweat lodge at a VA medical center in Wichita have been subjected to discrimination aimed at shutting down their religious services.

The Liberty Institute sent a letter Wednesday to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs concerning the Robert J. Dole Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

Daniel Bethe, Wikimedia Commons

SALINA, Kan.--Kansas Wesleyan University says it will begin offering 17 new majors and a revamped core curriculum during the next four years.

Officials from the university in Salina said Wednesday the new curriculum will allow departments to combine offerings. For example, art therapy would combine art and psychology studies.

Provost Nancy Cummings says the goal is to develop compelling programs and meet graduate's needs for employment.

Shubert Ciencia, flickr Creative Commons

The White House says a U.S. House budget bill would hurt Kansas, but the state's Congressional members say the president's proposals are worse.

The statement from President Obama's administration details the effects federal spending legislation in the House could have on Kansas programs, parks and agencies.

davidgsteadman, flickr Creative Commons

A Kansas board has picked a group with ties to two other casinos in the state to develop a new one in the state's southeast corner.

On Tuesday the casino review board selected a $70 million proposal from Kansas Crossing that was less expensive than two rival plans. The others included the $145 million Castle Rock casino that would have been within 2 miles of a Quapaw tribal casino in northeast Oklahoma.

The board split 5-2 between Kansas Crossing and Castle Rock.

J. Stephen Conn, flickr Creative Commons

A Wichita activist group is asking city officials to remove a Confederate flag from a display at Veterans Memorial Park.

The flag has been on display at the memorial in downtown Wichita since 1976, as part of a display of 13 historic flags that flew for the U.S. in war times.

The Confederate flag has become a flashpoint since the deaths of nine black people last week in a South Carolina church by a white man in a shooting police say was racially motivated.

alamosbasement, flickr Creative Commons

The Obama administration is giving Kansas more flexibility from the requirements of the Bush-era No Child Left Behind education law.

In addition to the nation's capital, Education Secretary Arne Duncan has renewed waivers for Kansas, as well as six other states and the District of Columbia. Current law requires standardized tests in reading and math to measure student progress. With the waivers, schools will be able come up with different ways to demonstrate improvement.

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Kansas Commerce Secretary Pat George says his state is close to reaching an agreement with Missouri that could end poaching of businesses between the two states.

Missouri and Kansas have competed for several years by offering incentives to persuade businesses to move across the border. The moves often did not result in many new jobs or investments for either state.

George says local and state officials from both states have been meeting to discuss the issue.

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