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Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

A Douglas County official says enough signatures have been gathered on Thursday to allow a grand jury to criminally investigate Secretary of State Kris Kobach's handling of Kansas' online voter registration system.

Douglas County Clerk Jamie Shew says that the petition has more than the required number of verified signatures.

The petition seeks an investigation into whether Secretary Kobach's office committed election fraud and voter suppression by deleting registration data.

Kansas tax collections missed the mark in July and came in below estimates by more than $12 million.

According to the AP, the Department of Revenue reported Monday that the state collected $425 million in taxes last month, compared with the state's official projection of nearly $438 million. The shortfall was 2.9 percent.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Gov. Sam Brownback and Kansas legislators are waiting to learn whether state tax collections in July fell short of expectations.

The monthly report due Monday afternoon from the state Department of Revenue could complicate the state's financial picture and lead to a fresh round of budget adjustments.

Tax collections have fallen short of expectations for 10 of the past 12 months.

In June, they were $34.5 million below the official state projections made in a fiscal forecast issued by officials and university economists in April. The shortfall was 5.7 percent.

Carla Eckels / KMUW, File Photo

A Shawnee County judge has ruled that 17,000 Kansans who registered to vote at the DMV will be able to vote in all races in the primary election.

Phil Cauthon for KHI News Service

Kansas plans to ask the federal government soon to recertify part of its state mental hospital in Osawatomie, a top social services official said Wednesday, a move that would restore less than half of its lost federal funding.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

For the second time in two years, a major ratings agency downgraded Kansas' credit rating Tuesday because of the state's budget problems.

From the AP:  

S&P Global Ratings dropped its rating for Kansas to "AA-," from AA, three months after putting the state on a negative credit watch. S&P also dropped the state's credit rating in August 2014.

Courtesy Nathan Bales

The Democratic National Convention kicked off today in Philadelphia. The plan is four nights of speeches which will culminate with Hillary Clinton formally accepting the presidential nomination on Thursday. KMUW’s Sean Sandefur spoke with a Democratic delegate from Kansas who’s attending the event.

A judge will hear arguments on whether to block the two-tiered voting system in Kansas just days before the primary election.

Shawnee County District Judge Larry Hendricks has set a July 29 hearing in Topeka on the American Civil Liberties Union's request for a temporary restraining order. The primary is Aug. 2.

Evan Vucci / AP

The chairman of Ted Cruz's campaign in Kansas said Thursday that the Texas senator has "harmed himself immeasurably" by not endorsing Donald Trump as the Republican presidential nominee. GOP Gov. Sam Brownback also expressed disappointment.

Kansas state Rep. Mark Kahrs of Wichita said he was disappointed in Cruz because the senator had the opportunity in his convention speech to "provide unity to our party and strengthen the ticket." Kahrs said he admires Cruz as a true conservative.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach has championed laws restricting voting that are rippling across the country. The conservative Republican argues the tough laws on voting eligibility are needed to protect elections against fraud, but critics contend such restrictions are unnecessary and suppress voter turnout, particularly among the young and minority voters.

Arizona enacted the nation's first proof of citizenship law in 2004, followed by similar laws in Kansas, Georgia and Alabama.

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