Beth Golay

Digital Content Marketing Manager

Beth Golay serves as KMUW's Digital Content Marketing Manager.

She is the founder and editor of Books & Whatnot, providing marketing support to bookstores around the world through her newsletter and website. Prior to launching Books & Whatnot, Beth was the marketing manager at Watermark Books & Cafe for 13 years. In fact, she represented Watermark as the KMUW book review commentator for 2 years while she was at the bookstore.

Beth's favorite genre is literary fiction, but she also loves creative non-fiction and reading the classics she should have attempted a long time ago. Her greatest reading accomplishment is a toss-up: Reading four books in one weekend (documented in January 2004) or completing the 1438 pages of Dumas’ The Count of Monte Cristo.

In addition to "reader" you can add "artist" and "runner" to her interest list. Beth is currently trying to run a marathon in every state. She has a long way to go.

Ways to Connect

Fletcher Powell / KMUW

Time and again we've been warned not to judge a book by its cover. But when you’re looking at one of the more than 1,000 book covers designed by Chip Kidd, it’s difficult to follow that advice. Especially when you understand the amount of research and planning that have gone into each of his cover designs.

So now, Chip Kidd has written a design book titled Go: A Kidd’s Guide to Graphic Design. Even though the title is a play on his name, it’s designed for “kids” ages 10 and up.

The Goldfinch is my first experience reading Donna Tartt. The title refers to a painting by Dutch artist Carel Fabritius, the greatest Old Master you've never heard of-- Rembrandt's pupil, Vermeer's teacher. Fabritius was killed when a gunpowder explosion destroyed half the town of Delft and all but a handful of his paintings.

Theo Decker is 13 years old when he sees "The Goldfinch" in contemporary New York City. In fact, the same day he first sees the painting, he takes it as he escapes from the bombed museum where it had been exhibited.

Luke Barr is an editor at Travel + Leisure magazine, and the grandnephew of famed food writer M.F.K. Fisher.

TheeErin / Flickr / Creative Commons

The title of Rhidian Brook's new novel, The Aftermath, refers to the years immediately following World War II.

The Gravity of Birds by Tracy Guzeman begins in 1963 with the Kessler Family spending their annual vacation at a lake cabin rental in Maine.

Book Review: Someone

Sep 23, 2013

Alice McDermott's new novel, Someone, focuses on an Irish Catholic family living in Brooklyn.

The Girl You Left Behind begins in France in 1916.

Most of the men from a small French village are off fighting in the war and the Germans have occupied the village. One of the women left behind, Sophie, is left to deal with this occupation of not only the village, but also her family inn and restaurant.

When Lee Sandlin was a young boy growing up in Chicago, each summer he was dropped off at the family home in Edwardsville, Ill., to stay with two great-aunts and two great-uncles. Sandlin describes his time there as a boot camp in old-fashioned values.

Antonia Lively Breaks the Silence by David Samuel Levinson is set in a sleepy university town a couple hours outside of New York City. The novel has a familiar cast of characters: an author, a book critic and the women who loved them.

Book Review: & Sons

Jul 29, 2013
npr.org

David Gilbert’s novel & Sons is about a somewhat reclusive author who has written a book that has captured the imaginations of readers through the decades, much like J.D. Salinger’s Catcher In The Rye.

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