Bryan Thompson

Bryan is the health reporter for Kansas Public Radio.

Sanofi Pasteur, flickr Creative Commons

Health officials in Reno County are trying to bring an outbreak of pertussis, or whooping cough, under control. Heartland Health Monitor’s Bryan Thompson has details.

The outbreak began in mid-May with three cases of the highly contagious respiratory disease. Now there are 23 reported cases, according to the Reno County Health Department, in Hutchinson. As of June 2, 134 cases of pertussis had been reported in Kansas this year.

DC Central Kitchen, flickr Creative Commons

The Kansas State Department of Education and four non-profit partners are going back to the drawing board in search of ways to keep rural children from going hungry when school is out. The Heartland Health Monitor’s Bryan Thompson reports.

Federal officials last month rejected a proposed demonstration project aimed at boosting participation in the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Summer Food Service Program. It sought to allow ten summer meal sites in rural Kansas to change the rules for participation.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services/Wikimedia Commons

Federal investigators say nearly all of the Medicare payments made to a Lawrence-based chiropractic group should not have been allowed. Heartland Health Monitor’s Bryan Thompson has details.

Medicare paid Lawrence-based Advance Chiropractic Services almost $765,000 for treatments in 2011 and 2012. An audit by the Department of Health and Human Services says almost none of those claims were legally allowable.

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

The U.S. Senate has approved bi-partisan legislation to clarify the circumstances under which veterans are allowed to get medical care from their hometown providers at the VA’s expense. Heartland Health Monitor’s Bryan Thompson has more…

Phil Cauthon for the KHI News Service

The Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services is starting an effort to restrict the number of patients admitted to the state mental hospital at Osawatomie. Bryan Thompson has more...

Federal regulators are requiring extensive renovations to make the antiquated Osawatomie State Hospital safer for patients.

KDADS Secretary Kari Bruffett says patients can’t be housed in areas where construction work is being done. That means 60 beds have to be emptied.

AAFP

Federal officials estimate that more than 1.3 million Kansans now have private health insurance that includes preventive services at no out-of-pocket cost. Heartland Health Monitor’s Bryan Thompson has more.

To meet the standards set by the Affordable Care Act, health insurance plans must offer a range of preventive services at no out-of-pocket cost to the patient--things like an annual wellness check-up, cancer screenings, and recommended immunizations.

The idea is to encourage people to catch serious health conditions like cancer or diabetes as early as possible.

Bryan Thompson

There are a lot of small, rural hospitals in Kansas. Without them, many residents would have to travel long distances for care. And in many small towns, the hospital is one of the largest employers - making it vital to the local economy. But declining populations, combined with changes in the way hospitals are paid for services, are making it more difficult for many to survive. Heartland Health Monitor's Bryan Thompson has more.

http://kansaspublicradio.org

Millions of veterans nationwide now have a card that's supposed to improve their access to health care. As Bryan Thompson explains, there are doubts about whether the VA is really serious about the new Veterans Choice program.

The Choice program is meant to let veterans get care from private providers if they live at least 40 miles from a VA healthcare facility, or if they face longer than a 30-day wait for an appointment. At a recent hearing, Kansas Senator Jerry Moran told Secretary Robert McDonald the VA seems to be putting its own welfare ahead of what’s best for veterans.

Bryan Thompson

Five months after its grand opening, a massive new-generation ethanol plant in the southwest corner of Kansas is undergoing final adjustments, as it prepares to begin full-scale production. 

The plant, built by a Spanish company with financing from the U.S. Department of Energy, is designed to produce clean-burning fuel—from the bits and pieces of crops left in farmers’ fields after harvest.

Heartland Health Monitor’s Bryan Thompson has more on the new Kansas plant and the environmental claims being made about it.

KPR

Nearly 400 dental professionals gathered in Salina this weekend to provide free dental care to those in need. Bryan Thompson has more on the 14th Kansas Mission of Mercy.

Salina orthodontist Cindy Reed says some of the 1,400 patients started lining up Wednesday afternoon—even though the free clinic didn’t begin until Friday morning.

“They’re very, very needy," Reed says. "They’re also very, very grateful.”

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