Bryan Thompson

Bryan Thompson joined the Kansas Health Institute in 2015 after more than 35 years in radio news. For the last 15 years he has worked with Kansas Public Radio, where he produced the award-winning series, “Kansas Health: A Prescription for Change,” and collaborated with the KHI News Service. Prior to his work at KPR, Bryan served as news director for commercial radio stations in El Dorado, Liberal and Salina. Bryan has partnered with NPR and Kaiser Health News through their “Health Care in the States” initiative. He was selected by the National Institutes of Health for its Medicine in the Media training program and by the Association of Health Care Journalists for its yearlong Midwest Health Journalism Fellowship. Bryan is a graduate of Wichita State University.

Bryan Thompson / Heartland Health Monitor

People who live in small towns across Kansas are struggling to save institutions that in their minds define their communities.

Anton Petukhov, flickr Creative Commons

The agency responsible for accrediting all dental education programs has decided to accredit so-called mid-level dental providers. As Heartland Health Monitor’s Bryan Thompson explains, the decision has implications for the ongoing effort to license those providers in Kansas.

Bryan Thompson

The federal government is providing more than $4 million this year to open six new health centers in Kansas. These clinics offer comprehensive primary care to everyone, whether the patient has insurance, or not. As Heartland Health Monitor’s Bryan Thompson reports, they can be a lifeline for people who struggle to pay for health care.

Dean Shareski, flickr Creative Commons

Johnson County health officials are trying to stop the spread of a water-borne disease caused by a microscopic germ.

At least three cases of Cryptosporidiosis have been confirmed in Johnson County.

The disease causes diarrhea and other intestinal symptoms. It can be spread through pool water, because it's resistant to chlorine.

This year's open enrollment for health insurance through the federal marketplace ended February 15th, and the 2016 sign-up period doesn't open until November first. But as Heartland Health Monitor's Bryan Thompson explains, thousands of Kansans have been able to sign up in the last six months anyway.

That's because of what the government refers to as special enrollment periods. They're based on the notion that life can change, so enrollment needs to be flexible.

Kansas is in the bottom half of the class in a new report from the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Action Network.

The report judges states on nine policies relating to cancer control and prevention. Kansas draws praise for raising tobacco taxes this year, for cancer pain control policies, and for its statewide Indoor Clean Air Act. But the state received failing marks for six other policy areas.

Bryan Thompson

The Clean Power Plan announced by President Obama yesterday is designed to reduce the amount of carbon emissions from power plants by almost one-third by the year 2030. How that will play out in Kansas remains to be seen, as Heartland Health Monitor's Bryan Thompson explains.

A Lyon County resident has been diagnosed with a mosquito-borne disease that had never been seen in the Western Hemisphere before 2013. As Heartland Health Monitor’s Bryan Thompson reports, the patient is believed to have been bitten by an infected mosquito while traveling in Central America.

Thousands of Kansans will soon be receiving letters notifying them that their electronic health records may have been compromised.

The letters are from a Fort Wayne, Indiana, company that provides an online patient portal called NoMoreClipboard used by 18 Kansas hospitals and at least half a dozen clinics. Most are small-town hospitals in western and southeastern Kansas. The largest is in Hutchinson.

Bryan Thompson

A demonstration project to make mental health care more accessible in southwest Kansas is almost ready to begin.

It’s based on the concept that physical ailments often go hand-in-hand with mental health challenges. Debbie Bruner, who heads Minneola Healthcare, about 20 miles south of Dodge City, says providers there see it every day.

“Especially with your diabetics and your COPDs, where it’s altered their lifestyle, a lot of times you will see depression coincide with that medical condition," Bruner says.