Bryan Thompson

Bryan is the health reporter for Kansas Public Radio.

Even with the Affordable Care Act, millions of Americans still lack health insurance. For them, safety net clinics are a lifeline. These clinics provide primary care for anyone, regardless of their ability to pay. Today there are federally-funded clinics in 21 Kansas counties, but as Bryan Thompson explains, there soon could be more.

http://breakfastintheclassroom.org

More Kansas students could soon be getting free breakfast at school. Bryan Thompson reports...

A program called Breakfast In the Classroom has added Kansas and six other states to the list of those eligible for the grant-funded program.

It’s too early to say how many kids might be affected. The program chooses individual school districts, based on how many kids qualify for free or reduced-price meals, how many participate in the federal school breakfast program, and the level of local support.

healthcare.gov

The federal health insurance marketplace opened for its second year of business Saturday. Bryan Thompson has the highlights.

Predictions of double-digit rate increases this year haven’t come true. A review by the non-profit Kansas Health Institute finds that, on average, premiums for plans sold in Kansas are up just one-tenth of one percent. But the average isn’t what matters to consumers.

Every plan is different. Some do have double-digit increases, but some have double-digit price drops.

The Topeka-based Kansas Health Institute has received a half-million dollar grant for its efforts to help public health departments find ways to work together.

photo by By Chris Potter (Flickr: 3D Judges Gavel) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

The City of Topeka is launching an effort to provide treatment, instead of jail, for people whose misdemeanor crimes are linked to mental illness.

The city will use a $91,000 grant from the Kansas Criminal Justice Coordinating Council to fund an Alternative Sentencing Court next year. 

Flickr Creative Commons/LensDog64

The VA has begun mailing cards to veterans who may need medical care outside the VA health care system. Kansas Public Radio's Bryan Thompson explains.

The cards are called Veterans Choice Cards. They’re intended for veterans who live more than 40 miles from the nearest VA health care facility—or who have faced excessive wait times for appointments.

With the card, veterans can get care from any medical provider who accepts Medicare, any federally-qualified health center, the Indian Health Service, or the Defense Department.

A new study by the University of Kansas finds many Kansans with disabilities are having difficulty getting services through KanCare, the privatized Medicaid managed care program created by the Brownback Administration. As Kansas Public Radio's Bryan Thompson reports, the study questions whether the financial savings from privatization are worth the human costs.

A new report on the well-being of Kansas children shows a steep drop in the number of kids who are fully immunized by the age of two, as recommended.

Officials from Wolf Creek, the only nuclear power plant in Kansas, updated the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Thursday on their efforts to solve persistent problems with the water supply that cools safety equipment at the plant. As Kansas Public Radio's Bryan Thompson reports, the NRC has been aware of the problems for the last five years.

The Regional Administrator for the Environmental Protection Agency says climate change is already happening in Kansas and the entire region. As Bryan Thompson reports, Administrator Karl Brooks says the best way to minimize climate change is to implement the EPA's Clean Power Plan.

Brooks says that’s because power plants are the largest uncontrolled source of carbon emissions in America.

“Our obligation to regulate those pollutants is clear," he says. "The Supreme Court announced that nearly six years ago.”

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