Bryan Thompson

Bryan is the health reporter for Kansas Public Radio.

One of the top officials of the Kansas Insurance Department has accepted a new position at a Topeka-based health policy think-tank.

The Kansas Health Institute has named Linda Sheppard as Senior Analyst and Strategy Team Leader for KHI's work surrounding health reform, effective the end of this month.

She'll provide analysis of state and federal health reform initiatives, including the Affordable Care Act, and their impact on Kansas.

A partnership between hospitals in Wichita has a lofty goal: to make Wichita the safest place in the nation to undergo surgery. As Bryan Thompson explains, the key is a standardized pre-op checklist, no matter where the surgery is being performed, or by whom.

The EPA has announced a plan to reduce the amount of carbon emitted by existing power plants. As Bryan Thompson explains, they’re proposing reduction targets, and leaving it up to the states how to meet those goals.

By the year 2030, the EPA wants Kansas to reduce emissions 23 percent below 2012 levels.

Gina Penzig is a spokeswoman for Westar Energy, the largest utility company in Kansas.

coutesy of SunflowerElectric

The Kansas Department of Health and Environment has approved a revised permit for expansion of a coal-fired power plant in Southwest Kansas.

The permit is for expansion of Sunflower Electric’s hotly-contested plant near Holcomb.

The Kansas Supreme Court last year mandated tighter controls on air pollution from the proposed expansion, requiring it to meet hourly limits.

The original permit called for three-hour averaging of emissions.

A federal program designed to revitalize disadvantaged neighborhoods is going to help people in the southeast Kansas community of Coffeyville get more physical activity.

The EPA has listed Coffeyville among 171 communities nationwide receiving $67-million this year through its Brownfields grant program.

Brownfields are abandoned industrial and commercial properties in need of environmental cleanup to spur redevelopment.

State health officials say four of the seven reported Kansas cases of kidney failure caused by toxin-producing bacteria may be related. Four of the patients attended the same private gathering.

Kansas Department of Health and Environment spokeswoman Aimee Rosenow said she can’t release any details about what kind of event the four patients attended, where it was, or when it took place. However, the two patients from Sedgwick County and two from Harvey County all were there.

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  First lady Michelle Obama says young people who've grown up with diversity must lead a national fight against prejudice and discrimination.

Speaking to Topeka high school graduates Friday, the first lady said the historic Brown versus Board of Education ruling against school segregation is "still being decided every single day."

Mrs. Obama said it will take all of today's young people to help solve the nation's problems.

Victoria Falls nursing home in Andover is facing a heavy fine from The Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services for abuse and neglect of residents. State investigators say they substantiated allegations that staff at Victoria Falls were both physically and verbally abusive to residents.

Bryan Thompson

For Americans who have disabilities, passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 remains a milestone.

Kansas Republican Senator Bob Dole led critical negotiations to ensure passage of the act.

As Dole continues his tour of Kansas, thanking people for the support over the years, Bryan Thompson asks the now 90-year-old statesman to rank the ADA among his accomplishments in the Senate.

The KU School of Medicine in Wichita is looking for people to take part in a study of poor leg circulation.

The study is focused on Peripheral Arterial Disease, a condition that typically clogs the arteries that supply blood to the legs and feet. It often causes pain or discomfort in the legs when walking. 

People with poor leg circulation have an increased risk of heart attack, stroke, and amputation.

African Americans are twice as likely as the rest of the population to suffer from Peripheral Arterial Disease.

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