Carla Eckels

Assistant News Director, Music Host

Carla Eckels is Assistant News Director at KMUW.  She's been an award-winning announcer/news producer for KMUW 89.1FM, Wichita Public Radio for 20 years. Carla also produces a R&B and gospel show Soulsations, Sunday nights at 6 on KMUW.  She also hosts Joyful Sounds, a Sunday morning gospel radio show on Q92FM.  Prior to KMUW, she was the local host for NPR’s Morning Edition at WYSO public radio in Yellow Springs, Ohio and co-hosted a nationally syndicated Gospel Countdown Radio show in Cincinnati. 

In April 2016, Wichita State University presented Carla with the exclusive honor of the Wayne Carlisle Distinguished Service Award, The Carlisle Award is presented to an unclassified professional who models the standard of extraordinary service exhibited by the late Wayne Carlisle.

Carla has reported on national news stories such as the Hesston Shootings, BTK serial killer case, Roeder trial, Greensburg tornadoes and the 1958 Dockum Drug Store sit-in for NPR.  The Dockum feature was the number one listened to story on KMUW’s website in 2007.

She’s the recipient of two Edward R. Murrow regional awards for her reporting including a 2015 award for her story on Shockers Men's Basketball: A Candid Look. Carla also won a 1st place Kansas Association of Broadcasting award in 2015  for her story on Bipolar Disorder and 2nd place for DJ Personality Aircheck for Soulsations.  Carla has annually emceed the Wichita River Festival and Black Arts Festival gospel music segments.

From 2004 to 2007, Carla hosted the number one gospel radio show on KSJM 107.9 JAMZ. She is the recipient of the Best Disc Jockey award voted on by subscribers of The Community Voice Newspaper.

Carla is a graduate of Wichita State University with a degree in communications. Her greatest joy is her family. She is married to Wichita and WSU Football Hall-of-Famer, Reuben Eckels and they have two children.

Ways to Connect

Sunday, October 23

Sunday on Soulsations hear new praise and worship music from gospel great Fred Hammond. It’s Hammond’s first live recording in almost two decades. He’s touring the country with other gospel artists as part of the Festival of Praise Tour

Courtesy

The new film Service to Man is a story about Eli Rosenberg, a white Jewish student in the 1960s who is accepted at Meharry Medical School, a black college in Nashville--the only school where he was accepted. He and black student Michael Dubois eventually forge a bond.

Service to Man is playing as part of Tallgrass Film Festival. KMUW’s Carla Eckels spoke with co-director Aaron Greer, who is in Wichita to speak at the festival.

Dan Moyle / flickr Creative Commons

In spite of a sluggish economy, Wichita home sales are expected to rise for the sixth straight year, according to the latest housing forecast from the Wichita State University Center for Real Estate.

The report says Wichita home sales should rise 5.8 percent by the end of this year and another 5 percent in 2017. Director Stan Longhofer says overall, the housing forecast looks very solid.

Kansas Global Trade Services

A Brookings Institution report ranks Wichita among the top metropolitan areas showing an increase in exports in 2015. The results are part of an effort made by the Kansas Global Trade Services in Wichita.

Wichita’s performance was third-best, at 6.8 percent, just behind Bakersfield, CA and New Orleans. Twenty-five Cents of every dollar of the Wichita economy is from a customer outside of the U.S.

Kansas Global’s Holli Schletzbaum says the non-profit company meets with people across the state to help them intentionally sell to other countries.

neetalparekh / flickr Creative Commons

The annual Wichita Employment Forecast has been released by the Center for Economic Development and Research at WSU. Non-farm employment is expected to increase by nearly 2500 jobs next year.

Director Jeremy Hill says the forecast for the Wichita area will grow by .8 percent, which is a little bit slow in growth from last year.

http://www.stepstoneks.org/stepstone

In less than a month, four domestic violence homicides occurred in Wichita, two of which were murder-suicides. StepStone, a two-year transitional housing program for survivors, was awarded a $25,000 grant to help end domestic violence.

Program director Dung Kimble says the grant will be used to facilitate three national speakers as well as implement local training for law enforcement.

Courtesy Wichita Public Library/GLMV Architects

The Wichita Public Library Foundation has received a $100,000 gift from John Hyde, grandson of a Wichitan who invented mentholatum ointment.

The funds will go towards the campaign to build Wichita’s new Advanced Learning Library.

John Hyde serves on the foundation's board of directors and is Professor Emeritus of History at Williams College in Massachusetts. Hyde says he believes in supporting a project that invests in the knowledge of the community and the preservation of its history.

ALEX WONG / GETTY IMAGES

The first U.S. presidential debate is on Monday night between Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton and her Republican rival Donald Trump. KMUW's Carla Eckels spoke with a Wichita debate coach about the matchup.

Jeff Jarman is interim director of the Elliott School of Communication, as well as the WSU debate coach. He says it will be fascinating to see how well each candidate can stick to their expectations.

Jarman says a lot of what the debates reveal is the character of the candidates, and he says we watch them to see if they can be presidential.

Alan Karchmer for NMAAHC

When the Smithsonian Institution opens the National Museum of African American History and Culture this Saturday, Sept. 24, in Washington, D.C., the celebration will reach beyond the nation's capital to Bethel College in North Newton.

wikipedia.org

The Kansas Corporation Commission will hold a public hearing Monday about a rate hike requested by the Kansas Gas Service.

The KCC is seeking input from the public regarding an application from the Kansas Gas Service to increase it’s utility rates. Linda Berry, KCC Public Affairs Director, says the gas company is requesting a $ 28 million rate increase.

"The average monthly bill for residential customers would increase about $4.34-per-month, and that’s an increase of about 7.4 percent," Berry says.

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