Curt Clonts

Art Commentator

Curt Clonts was raised in Wichita, Kansas. He left in 1977 for Los Angeles where he spent time surfing, making art, and immersing himself in the punk music scene. He then moved to Okinawa, Japan, where he met, married his wife, Taeko, and they had the first of their three children. After leaving Japan Curt moved with his family to New Orleans where he started the monthly punk rock musical publication Public Threat, and also created and sold art. Curt then took a job in the coffee business in Dallas, Texas, where he also made and sold his art. After a move to El Paso, Texas, Curt then decided to relocate his family to his hometown of Wichita where they have lived since 1991.

After moving back to Wichita, Curt founded the College Hill Coffee Company, which he eventually sold. He then began to paint and create art on a daily basis. Curt became a member of Wichita's Famous Dead Artists (a Wichita art co-op). He founded Art Soup in which he would curate art exhibitions featuring working artists of the '90s. He co-founded The Tractor Factory, one of the seminal art studio/exhibition sites in Wichita's explosive '90s art scene. Curt also regularly contributed articles on art and music for Wichita alternative newspapers SEEN and F5.

In 2006 Curt became the Artist-In-Residence at Friends University and held this position until 2013. He also founded The Ginger Rabbits arts co-op during this time. Articles on Curt have been featured in The New Orleans Times-Piccayune, The Dallas Morning News, The Wichita Eagle, Juxtapose Magazine, and Punk Globe Magazine, among others.

Curt's art is included in the collections at the Wichita Art Museum, Emprise Bank, Center for the Arts, and many personal collections.

Curt paints daily in his College Hill home studio while listening to music at blaring decibels. He exhibits his work on a regular basis. He enjoys scotch, cooking, collecting art and books, grandchildren, and having regular coffee and discussing art with artist friends. He has a disdain for politicians, broccoli, and spending any money with national chains. He avoids telephone conversations at almost any cost.

I've always felt that a sculptor suffers most for his or her art. To coax emotion and greatness from stone, steel, bronze, or wood is torturous.

While the story of Lindsborg Artist Mike Hartung is a delicious one, it is also achingly sad.

My wife Taeko and I recently took our 2-year-old granddaughter, Hazel, to the Wichita Art Museum's outdoor sculpture garden. The late afternoon was gorgeous and Hazel was captivated by the great sculptural works and the beautiful plant life.

Torin Andersen

This week, consider packing yourself a sack lunch and heading down to City Arts. In the 2nd floor gallery you will find the new exhibition Bibs & Forks Food Invitational.

I'm getting older. I'm 58. I started seriously selling my art when I was 26. I get to see some of that 32-year-old work from time to time and am struck by the directions I took.

In 1975 I stepped in to my first art class at Wichita East High. 

Mrs. Annie Lowrey, my art teacher, asked us to draw a simple still life. She asked me to stay after class that first day. She asked where I had taken art lessons. She asked me who my favorite artists were. And she asked me if I was high

Jean-Michel Basquiat died of a heroin overdose at age 27 in 1988 after having been a professional artist for only 7 years.

I know this woman, artist Chiyoko Myose. And knowing her makes her current exhibition--Movements of Thread-- on view at City Arts confirm what I have always known: Her work is a real extension of her being--her actual soul.

"Pierced By Dogma" is the name of painter Patrick Duegaw's exhibition currently on view at the Ulrich. Upon entering the show of Duegaw self-portraits, I found what is, essentially, the artist stripped bare.

Kelsy Gossett is off like a Saturn Five rocket with her new exhibition called "For Your Viewing Pleasure" at The Diver on Commerce Street.

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