Deborah Shaar

News Reporter

Reporter Deborah Shaar joined the news team at KMUW in September 2014. She spent more than a dozen years working in news at both public and commercial radio and television stations in Ohio, West Virginia, and Detroit, Michigan. Before relocating to Wichita, Deborah taught news and broadcasting classes at Tarrant County College in the Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas, area.

Deborah’s reporting has been featured on NPR newscasts and Morning Edition. In 2016, she earned a regional RTDNA Edward R. Murrow award for investigative reporting (Searching for Zebra Mussels in Wellington Lake). The Kansas Association of Broadcasters recognized her reporting with two awards in 2016 (Hesston: Sounds of Resilience and FAA Airport Weather Observer Series) and one award in 2015 (Hesston’s Recovery 25 Years after an F-5 Tornado Hit).

She began her on-air career as a news reporter and anchor at several small market TV stations in southeast Ohio and West Virginia. She fine-tuned her writing and producing skills while working on a highly rated three-hour morning news show at the Fox TV affiliate in Detroit, Michigan. From there, she put her on-air, writing and producing skills to good use: training and developing broadcast news students at Ohio University. As managing editor of the WOUB radio and television newsroom, Deborah served in a crucial role as supervisor of the student-staffed nightly television newscast. Many of her student anchors, reporters and producers earned prestigious national, state and regional awards—and still work in the news business today. She continued her on-air work as a fill-in anchor for a statewide TV news network in Ohio.

Deborah earned Bachelor and Master of Science degrees in journalism from Ohio University. Her master’s thesis is a historical narrative about the transformation of journalism training at the University of Leipzig, Germany, as a result of Germany’s reunification.

Ways to Connect

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

The City of Wichita is exploring the possibility of creating a public-private partnership to pay for the next phase of its Century II Performing Arts and Convention Center.

At 48 years old, the downtown circular building with the light blue roof is showing its age, and the convention business has changed. Also, the city-owned public library next door will be vacant in a few years.

City Manager Robert Layton said Tuesday that the city is considering a number of options for remodeling Century II or building new facilities based on results from a 2014 market study.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW/File photo

Wichita State University is in the process of changing its student fee structure to be more equitable.

Student fees pay for athletics and student services, and are currently calculated per credit hour. WSU wants to begin a flat-fee system where students pay fees based on the number of credit hours they take.

There would be three levels of student fees; all students in each level would pay the same amount.

WSU says the change will only impact student fees. Course fees, certain program fees and infrastructure fees will remain a per credit hour fee.

Andover Public Schools

Voters in the Andover Public School District will have an opportunity to decide two bond proposals on Tuesday.

The first proposition includes nine projects at a cost of about $169 million.

If approved, two new schools would be built, storm shelters would be added to six schools and all school entrances would get security upgrades.

Superintendent Greg Rasmussen says taxpayers won’t see an increase in the tax rate, but would pay an additional 17 years of taxes if this bond issue is approved.

frankieleon, flickr Creative Commons

Kansans safely disposed of more than eight tons of unused medicines during last week’s National Drug Take-Back Day, Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt said today.

Kansas law enforcement officers collected 16,314 pounds of medicines at more than 100 locations throughout the state during last Saturday’s event, according to a report from the federal Drug Enforcement Administration. This was the largest single-day of collection since the semi-annual program began in 2010, far surpassing the 13,894 pounds collected in April 2016.

Derek Gavey / flickr Creative Commons

Regulations that affect Kansas’ agriculture producers and the quality of life in rural communities are under review at the federal level.

President Trump created a task force to identify policy changes that would help boost economic growth.

More than 20 cabinet-level and senior members of government agencies are on the Task Force On Agriculture and Rural Prosperity.

One area they’re studying is how the estate tax affects the perseveration of family farms and other agribusiness operations.

Trooper Tod KHP Hays, Kansas / Facebook

Clean-up is underway in western Kansas, following a weekend blizzard that dumped heavy snow and knocked down trees and power lines.

Most of the highways that were shut down due to the heavy snow were back open by noon on Monday, but there were still icy spots.

The Kansas Highway Patrol reported numerous crashes along a stretch of I-70.

National Guard teams were called out more than 40 times to rescue stranded drivers. Fourteen National Guard teams operated from seven locations in northwest and southwest Kansas on Sunday.

Sedgwick County Sheriff's Office

Attorneys for three men accused of plotting to attack Somali immigrants in Garden City are asking for another delay in their federal trial.

The defense attorneys and federal prosecutors want to push back the start date because they say the case is complex and there is a large amount of evidence.

The trial is currently scheduled to begin June 13. It had previously been set to start in April.

A community rally is planned for Sunday evening at Wichita State University to help close what organizers call the “racial divide” in Wichita.

A group called ‘Beyond Tolerance Wichita’ is hosting the event to promote building relationships among different ethnic and religious communities in the city.

Rabbi Michael Davis of Congregation Emanu-El says it’s about bringing people together.

Courtesy photo

Due to an uptick in car break-ins, the Wichita Police Department is warning gun owners to be vigilant when storing a firearm in their vehicles.

Wichita police say so far this year, thieves have stolen 78 guns out of cars throughout the city.

The break-ins have happened in retail parking lots, along city streets and in home driveways.

Sgt. Nikki Woodrow says if you have to leave a gun in a vehicle, take extra precaution.

"Have a lock box, have that extra safety measure, have a lock around your gun – that could be a major deterrent," she says.

Law enforcement officers in Kansas and across the country will be collecting unused, expired and leftover medications on Saturday.

It’s an initiative called the National Drug Take-Back Day.

The drug collection events are a way to safely dispose of leftover and expired medications to prevent accidental or intentional misuse.

Studies show a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabinet.

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