Fletcher Powell

Production Manager and All Things Considered Host

If Fletcher Powell could be someone else, he’d be Errol Morris or Ira Glass. Except younger and better looking.

Since he can’t, he’ll be Fletcher Powell, KMUW Production Manager and host of All Things Considered. Fletcher came to KMUW in 2009 after five years of working in the stock market (don’t ask). He feels like this line of work fits him a little better than that one did.

Fletcher has a BA in Psychology from the University of Kansas and an MA in Communication from Wichita State University. He’s lived in Wichita most of his life, aside from some brief stops in Iowa and Ohio. He likes baseball, guinea pigs, and the Oxford comma.

Ways to Connect

To paraphrase Groucho Marx, I’ve seen a very funny movie… but this wasn’t it.

A movie called The Comedian isn’t required to be funny. There are plenty of reasons a movie with that title might not be. A movie called The Comedian that features at least half a dozen extended sequences of standup comedy probably should be at least a little bit funny. Here, no such luck.

From the opening chords to the score of Jackie, something feels a bit off. 

M. Night Shyamalan has had a strange career. The director kicked down the door with 1999’s The Sixth Sense, then had a couple of fantastic follow-up films before falling hard and fast into self-indulgence and eventually making a few of what are considered the worst films of the past decade.

But then, all of a sudden, with 2015’s wonderfully creepy The Visit, and now his newest thriller, Split, it appears that Shyamalan is back. And what’s more, for the first time it seems like he’s actually having fun making movies.

Silence offers no easy answers. In fact, it may not offer any answers at all.

Indie Film Guide: January 13 – 26

I can safely say that before Hidden Figures, I’d never once seen a movie that received two separate rounds of applause at the end. Without a doubt, this is a crowd pleaser.

And fortunately, that’s far from all it is. 

I’ll tell you a story—the story of a boy who had to grow up too fast and who met a monster, a monster with a powerful wisdom.

Well, this must be the most emotionally powerful Google search of all time.

Lion is one of those movies that would seem completely preposterous if it weren’t based on a true story, but as it is, it makes you wonder at how in the world life turns out the way it does.

This month on the KMUW Movie Club, we talk about our favorite features that have been directed by women, as well as a look back at 2016 in film.

As we move from 2016 into the new year, Fletcher Powell takes a look at a couple of his favorite movies that deal with transitions and change.


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