Grant Gerlock

Harvest Public Media's reporter at NET News, where he started as Morning Edition host in 2008. He joined Harvest Public Media in July 2012. Grant has visited coal plants, dairy farms, horse tracks and hospitals to cover a variety of stories. Before going to Nebraska, Grant studied mass communication as a grad student at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, and completed his undergrad at Buena Vista University in Storm Lake, Iowa. He grew up on a farm in southwestern Iowa where he listened to public radio in the tractor, but has taken up city life in Lincoln, Neb.

Brian Seifferlein / Harvest Public Media

On Thursday, China announced plans to begin buying beef from the U.S. again. That’s after a 13-year ban based on concerns about Mad Cow disease.

China banned imports of American beef in 2003 after a dairy cow in Washington State was discovered with BSE, also called mad cow disease.

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said that forced U.S. producers to build exports elsewhere, and a deal with China could further boost the industry.

Brian Seifferlein / Harvest Public Media

Living in the Platte River Valley in central Nebraska means understanding that the water in your well may contain high levels of nitrates and may not be safe to drink.

“When our first son was born in 1980, we actually put a distiller in for our drinking water here in the house,” says Ken Seim, who lives in the Platte Valley near the town of Chapman, Nebraska. “And at that time our water level was a 12 parts per million.”

Grant Gerlock / Harvest Public Media

When shoppers browse meat at the grocery store, they are confronted with all kinds of brands and labels, making it hard to tell whether the meat they buy comes from animals that were raised humanely. Organic producers want to answer that question more clearly, but conventional farmers are charging that proposed changes to organic standards would amount to unfair government backing of the organic industry.

Crop Watch / University of Nebraska

Farmers in Kansas are dealing with a disease that can damage corn and has been confirmed in the U.S. for the first time. As Harvest Public Media’s Grant Gerlock reports, it appears to be spreading in the heart of the Corn Belt.

BRIAN SEIFFERLEIN / HARVEST PUBLIC MEDIA

Getting burgers and wings to your plate is a dangerous business. Federal regulators and meat companies agree there’s more work to do to make the slaughterhouse safe. And while there are signs the industry is stepping up its efforts, danger remains. In the final part of our series Dangerous Jobs, Cheap Meat, Harvest Public Media’s Grant Gerlock explains why.

Brian Seifferlein / Harvest Public Media

A slaughterhouse is a safer place to work than it used to be, according to a government report. But it’s still dangerous work, and not all injuries are being counted

Injury rates in the meatpacking industry got better over the last decade but are probably worse than the data suggests. That’s the conclusion of a study from the Government Accountability Office.

The GAO says incidents at meat and poultry plants are underreported by workers who are afraid to lose their jobs, and by medical staff who send people back to work even when they’re hurt.

ethanolpics, flickr Creative Commons

That’s bad news for farmers hoping ethanol will help increase grain prices. But Brad Lubben, an economist at the University of Nebraska, says demand for ethanol could still increase in foreign markets.

"The growth in the biofuels market may increasingly focus on export potential because of these continued lingering issues about the national renewable fuels mandate," Lubben says.

Most of the increase in renewable fuels requested by the EPA would come from advanced fuels like biodiesel which have a smaller carbon footprint than corn ethanol.

Mike Mozart, flickr Creative Commons

A group of Nebraska farmers is suing the giant seed and chemical company, Monsanto, saying the company’s herbicide, Roundup, gave them cancer.

Three Nebraska farmers and an agronomist filed the suit alleging that Roundup caused their illness and that Monsanto downplayed research showing the chemical’s cancer risk. Similar cases have been filed in California, New York, and Delaware. Monsanto says the claim is not supported by science.

Grant Gerlock / Harvest Public Media

Millions of kids eat their lunch at school. Schools in the United States served more than 5 billion meals as part of the national school lunch program last year. Each meal has to meet federal rules for nutrition. As Harvest Public Media’s Grant Gerlock reports, those rules are up for debate and changes could be coming to the cafeterias.

Grant Gerlock / Harvest Public Media

Some of the most important medicines doctors prescribe to fight infections are losing effectiveness and the Obama administration is calling on farmers to help turn the tide against antibiotic-resistant bacteria. A recent report by the president’s advisors on antibiotic resistance charts some progress but also left some critics urging for more immediate action.

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