J. Schafer

J. Shafer is the news director for Kansas Public Radio

Jeff Carmody

Kansas Congresswoman Lynn Jenkins emphasized the role of women in community leadership on Sunday, when she delivered the Dole Lecture at the University of Kansas.

"Whether we learn it as babysitters or big sisters or mothers, we are good at keeping everybody happy and a lot of balls in the air and multitasking," Congresswoman Jenkins says. "We just have unique skill sets that maybe some of our men don't have." 

She also highlighted some of the challenges of a career in public office.

J. Schafer

The University of Kansas has received its largest private donation ever - $58 million. KU Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little announced the gift on Tuesday from the estate of Al and Lila Self.

"The Selfs have given the largest, single gift that we've ever received from an individual. This gift, in combination with what they've given before, totals 106 million dollars," the chancellor said.

KU alumni Al and Lila Self died last year, both at the age of 91. The largest part of the couple's $58 million gift will be used for graduate fellowships.

There's going to be a panel discussion on journalism and politics at the University of Kansas.

NPR political correspondent Juana Summers is joining three other reporters to talk about the midterm elections, including some tight races here in Kansas.

"The Kansas Governors race is one that surprised a lot of people," she says. "A lot of people, as you know, were not expecting this race as to be as hot as it is, but it's getting the attention of national political reporters just based on how close it is and the fact that it was unexpected."

The battle over the ballot in the Kansas Senate race continues. Shawnee County District Attorney Chad Taylor, the Democratic nominee, is trying to keep his name off the ballot this November.

Secretary of State Kris Kobach is trying to keep his name on. And now, the Kansas Supreme Court will decide. J. Schafer has more.

Next week, the Kansas Supreme Court will hold a hearing on a petition by Chad Taylor to get his name removed from the ballot. The court has scheduled arguments for 9am Tuesday.

Kansas Governor Sam Brownback and other Republicans held a short rally in Topeka to celebrate their Tuesday night primary victories. But Wednesday's celebration was clouded by news that yet another agency had downgraded the state's creditworthiness.

Joined by fellow Republicans who also won their primaries, Governor Brownback urged the party faithful to promote what he calls the "Kansas Economic Comeback." 

On Tuesday, Republican primary voters will have to choose between two candidates vying for the office of Kansas Secretary of State.

Incumbent Kris Kobach is seeking a second term, but first, he’ll have to fend-off a challenge from Lawrence attorney Scott Morgan, who has positioned himself as a moderate alternative to the more conservative Kobach.

We'll hear from Kris Kobach in a moment. But first, KPR's J. Schafer brings us more from the challenger, Scott Morgan.

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach predicts 22% of registered voters will cast a ballot in next Tuesday's primary election.

That's similar to the statewide turnout in the 2008 primary, which he says is the one most like this year's contest.

Higher turnout is expected this year in the Wichita area, where former Republican Congressman Todd Tiahrt is trying to take back his old seat from incumbent Congressman Mike Pompeo. Kobach says this could mean 30% of registered voters in the district might show up at the polls.

A new Kansas gun law is being challenged in court. The Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence, which is based in Washington, D.C., has filed a lawsuit against Kansas because of a new state law that declares guns made and kept in Kansas are exempt from federal gun laws.

The new state law is called the “Second Amendment Protection Act.”

A massive sinkhole in western Kansas continues to grow. The sinkhole recently developed in Wallace County, near the town of Sharon Springs.