Jay Price

History commentator

Jay M. Price is chair of the department of history at Wichita State University, where he also directs the public history program.

His works include Temples for a Modern God: Religious Architecture in Postwar America, Gateways to the Southwest: The Story of Arizona State Parks, Wichita, 1860-1930, and El Dorado!: Legacy of an Oil Boom. He has co-authored Wichita's Legacy of Flight, the Cherokee Strip Land Rush, Wichita’s Lebanese Heritage, and Kansas: In the Heart of Tornado Alley.

He is currently on the board of the Kansas Humanities Council, the Wichita Sedgwick County Historical Museum, and the Kansas State Historic Sites Board of Review.

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Commentary
12:30 pm
Wed May 15, 2013

Past and Present: Preservation

The Brutalist-style Central branch of the Wichita Public Library was built in the 1960s.
Credit Fletcher Powell / KMUW

My research includes the study of buildings constructed from about World War II to the 1970s.

It began with a study of Route 66 and the features along the “Mother Road.” Since then, my interest in the postwar built-landscape has extended to suburban ranch homes, one of which I just purchased, and to the religious landscape of 1950s and 1960s America.

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Commentary
12:30 pm
Wed April 3, 2013

Past and Present: The Reality of History

Credit xmacex / Flickr

Many in the general public think of history as dry textbooks and the memorization of lists of dates, wars, kings and presidents. But memorizing facts is no more history than practicing free throws is basketball.

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Commentary
12:30 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

Past and Present: Architect Behind Some Well-Known Wichita Buildings

Uel Clifton Ramey
Credit Steve Ramey

Historians study those who shape the world in which we live, including those who designed the physical space around us. One such person was architect Uel Clifton Ramey.

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Commentary
12:30 pm
Wed January 23, 2013

Past and Present: Kellogg, The Lost Thoroughfare

Credit Amy Delamaide

More than just a road, Kellogg is a major landmark, separating the main downtown and upscale districts of central and northern Wichita from the aviation plants and blue-collar neighborhoods that lie “south of Kellogg.”

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