Kristofor Husted

Before joining KBIA in July 2012, Kristofor Husted reported for the science desk at NPR in Washington. There, he covered health, food and environmental issues. His work has appeared on NPR’s health and food blogs, as well as with WNYC, WBEZ and KPCC, among other member stations. As a multimedia journalist, he's covered topics ranging from the King salmon collapse in Northern California to the shutdown of a pollution-spewing coal plant in Virginia. His short documentary, “Angela’s Garden,” was nominated for a NATAS Student Achievement Award by the Television Academy.

Husted was born in Napa, Calif., and received his B.S. in cell biology from UC Davis, where he also played NCAA water polo. He earned an M.S. in journalism from Medill at Northwestern University, where he was honored as a Comer scholar for environmental journalism. 

Kristofor Husted / Harvest Public Media

President Donald Trump issued an executive order Tuesday directing the Environmental Protection Agency to revise a controversial environmental rule opposed by many Midwest farm groups.

Trump ordered new EPA administrator Scott Pruitt to formally revise the Obama Administration’s 2015 Clean Water Rule, also known as the Waters of the U.S. Rule, which was meant to explain which rivers, streams and creeks are subject to regulation by the EPA.

donaldjtrump.com

Farm groups are urging President Donald Trump to go back to the negotiating table after he pulled the U.S. out of a landmark trade deal.

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) was expected to be worth billions to U.S. farmers in exports to 11 other countries along the Pacific Rim.

Now that Trump has killed that deal, the agriculture industry is eager to see what the new administration can negotiate.

Dave Salmonsen with the American Farm Bureau Federation says one option is to deal one-on-one, starting with Japan.

Bruce Tuten, flickr Creative Commons

President-elect Donald Trump named former Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue as his pick for Secretary of Agriculture on Thursday. Harvest Public Media’s Kristofor Husted reports on what it means for farmers in the Midwest.

If confirmed, Perdue will have to take on a new farm bill, immigration issues and the big whammy: trade.

Eugene Kim, flickr Creative Commons

Local food was worth $8.7 billion to farmers last year.

The Agriculture Department commissioned a survey to get a handle on the economic impact of the local food industry. The results are in: More than 167,000 farms across the U.S. sold produce, milk, and meat directly to shoppers in 2015.

The largest chunk of sales – about 40 percent – came from local schools, hospitals and wholesalers.

Pat Blank / Harvest Public Media

There is a battle going on in the organic industry over hydroponics, the technique of growing plants without soil. The debate gets at the very heart of what it means to be “organic” and may change the organic food available to grocery store shoppers.

To be labeled as organic, fruits and vegetables are required to be grown without genetic modification or synthetic chemicals, and to meet other rules set out by the Agriculture Department. But what about produce that isn’t grown in the dirt?

Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

Shareholders of agricultural seed and chemical giant Monsanto agreed to a merger on Tuesday, moving the controversial deal one-step closer to fruition.

German drug and chemical maker Bayer plans to pay shareholders $66 billion to take over Missouri-based Monsanto. That breaks down to $128 per share if the merger closes.

Meriwether Lewis Elementary / flickr Creative Commons

Changes to the $22 billion federal program that distributes free meals at schools won’t be coming any time soon.

A bipartisan U.S. Senate bill would have delayed requirements to reduce sodium in school meals, expanded summer meal programs and grown the Women Infants and Children (WIC) food program.

A House committee passed a sharply different bill and negotiators couldn’t hammer out differences. That leaves the child nutrition programs operating under the policies set in 20-10.

b inxee, flickr Creative Commons

What it means to grow organic produce may be re-defined. Kristofor Husted reports on infighting in the organic world.

Some farmers grow produce, not in soil, but in water: A system called hydroponics, and they want to be able to label their fruits and vegetables as organic.

But many growers say the very point of organic produce is to nurture soil.

The National Organic Standards Board makes recommendations to the Agriculture Department. Board member Emily Oakley says it plans to send a strong message that hydroponic systems are not organic.

Grant Gerlock / Harvest Public Media

Many low-income families struggle to afford enough food. Moms and kids who qualify can participate in a federal program geared toward early development. Once kids turn five, though, they are no longer eligible for the benefits. Harvest Public Media’s Kristofor Husted reports on how that puts families at risk.

It’s 7:30 in the morning at Battle Elementary School in Columbia, Missouri. Students hop off of their buses, head down the hallway past a few folding tables with crates of milk, fruit juice and warm muffins sitting on top.

Kristofor Husted / Harvest Public Media

When heavy rains wash through farm country, chemicals from agricultural fields spill into small tributaries and eventually make their way to the Gulf of Mexico. That’s created an environmental disaster. For Harvest Public Media’s special series “Watching Our Water,” Kristofor Husted reports on new research into combating the problem.

Farming in the fertile Midwest is tied to an environmental disaster in the Gulf of Mexico. But scientists are studying new ways to lessen the Midwest’s environmental impact and improve water quality.

Pages