Kristofor Husted

Before joining KBIA in July 2012, Kristofor Husted reported for the science desk at NPR in Washington. There, he covered health, food and environmental issues. His work has appeared on NPR’s health and food blogs, as well as with WNYC, WBEZ and KPCC, among other member stations. As a multimedia journalist, he's covered topics ranging from the King salmon collapse in Northern California to the shutdown of a pollution-spewing coal plant in Virginia. His short documentary, “Angela’s Garden,” was nominated for a NATAS Student Achievement Award by the Television Academy.

Husted was born in Napa, Calif., and received his B.S. in cell biology from UC Davis, where he also played NCAA water polo. He earned an M.S. in journalism from Medill at Northwestern University, where he was honored as a Comer scholar for environmental journalism. 

Grant Gerlock / Harvest Public Media

Many low-income families struggle to afford enough food. Moms and kids who qualify can participate in a federal program geared toward early development. Once kids turn five, though, they are no longer eligible for the benefits. Harvest Public Media’s Kristofor Husted reports on how that puts families at risk.

It’s 7:30 in the morning at Battle Elementary School in Columbia, Missouri. Students hop off of their buses, head down the hallway past a few folding tables with crates of milk, fruit juice and warm muffins sitting on top.

Kristofor Husted / Harvest Public Media

When heavy rains wash through farm country, chemicals from agricultural fields spill into small tributaries and eventually make their way to the Gulf of Mexico. That’s created an environmental disaster. For Harvest Public Media’s special series “Watching Our Water,” Kristofor Husted reports on new research into combating the problem.

Farming in the fertile Midwest is tied to an environmental disaster in the Gulf of Mexico. But scientists are studying new ways to lessen the Midwest’s environmental impact and improve water quality.

Katja Schulz, flickr Creative Commons and Wikipedia

In an effort to turn away from chemical pesticides, which have the potential to damage the environment, some farmers are looking in a new direction in the age-old, quiet struggle on farm fields of farmers versus pests. They’re warding off intruding insects and noxious weeds with bugs and chickens.

Blackburnphoto / Flickr, creative commons

Farm income is down in the Midwest, according to a new report from the Federal Reserve, and that’s left more farmers relying on banks.

Low prices for crops like soybeans and corn, coupled with high input costs have pushed more farmers to apply for loans. Banks, though, have tightened lending.

Nathan Kauffman with the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City says there is a bright spot, though, and that’s China’s demand for American products.

The town of Brookfield, in north-central Missouri, is a close-knit community with a population of about 4,500.

Becky Cleveland, who grew up here, says that when she was a kid, there were four grocery stores. Today there is just one, and a nearby Wal-Mart.

Iker Merodio / flickr Creative Commons

Midwest producers eager to get more products into Europe have cause for concern after the UK voted to leave the EU.

U.S. agriculture has had its eyes on the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, or TTIP, to loosen up tariffs in the EU on dairy and meat products. Agricultural policy analyst Julian Binfield at the University of Missouri says the momentum created by the recent UK vote--the so-called Brexit--could stymie that deal.

NIAID, flickr Creative Commons

Scientists have discovered a third instance of a so-called superbug, raising concerns about its spread.

Researchers found E. coli bacteria that is resistant to one of the strongest antibiotics available in a pig at an Illinois slaughterhouse.

The worry is that this resistance will spread to bacteria that are also resistant to other drugs, effectively making bacteria immune to antibiotics.

The gene in question first popped up in China last fall. In the U.S., it was first detected in a pig in March and also in a Pennsylvania woman.

Whenever I'm out reporting in the field, I can tell many ranchers have a powerful connection with their cattle — it seems they can almost understand them. But researchers today are digging deeper to figure out exactly what cows are saying — and how they communicate through their moos.

I drove out to the research farm at the University of Missouri to ask cattle geneticist Jared Decker to share his expert insights.

Kristofor Husted / Harvest Public Media

We all learned it as kids: Old MacDonald has a farm and on that farm he has a cow that says “moo.” But why? Why do cows moo? It's among the most pressing questions of our time.

Harvest Public Media sent report Kristofor Husted out to investigate, and he has this hard-hitting report.

Turn on the TV and you can barely escape the acronym TPP.

The Trans-Pacific Partnership is a free trade deal between the U.S. and 11 other countries that's currently being negotiated. Presidential candidates on both sides of the aisle are deriding the TPP, saying it's a bum deal that will hurt the U.S. economy and especially low-wage workers.