Kyle Palmer

Kyle Palmer is KCUR’s morning newscaster. He’s a former teacher, so getting up early is nothing for him. Before moving to the classroom, Kyle earned a Journalism degree from Mizzou and worked as a reporter for Columbia’s NPR affiliate KBIA. He also did play-by-play for the Jefferson City High School football and basketball teams. He earned a national Edward R. Murrow Award for a radio documentary about Missouri’s New Madrid fault (it’s still there, people, and ready to blow!).

He’s lived in Texas, California, and India, and also earned a Master’s degree in Education Policy from Stanford University, where he was also the PA announcer for the women’s and men’s volleyball team. (Ask him anything about volleyball.)

He now lives in Kansas with his wife. And they agree: of all the places they’ve lived, Kansas is the most…interesting. 

Andrea Ramsey for Congress

Retired lawyer and former community health nonprofit executive Andrea Ramsey announced Friday that she is dropping out of the race for Kansas' 3rd Congressional District.

k-state.edu

The FBI is now investigating an incident at Kansas State University this week as a hate crime. Racist slurs and threats were found scrawled on a car near campus. K-State president Richard Myers says the university is taking steps to ensure safety and security.

In a statement, Myers says K-State police will increase patrols on campus, and the university will review to see if it needs to add security cameras.

Myers says the graffiti should not “be allowed to create a culture of fear and divisiveness.” It’s just the latest racially charged incident to rock K-State.

The foster father of three Kansas sisters missing for nearly two months says they are welcome to return home.

Tonganoxie police announced this morning that Emily, Aimee, and Christin Utter had been found, and also that a 48-year-old man who had been named a "person of interest" in the case had been arrested.

The girls’ foster father, Terry Miller, says the girls have not been returned to his home but says he’s relieved they were found apparently unharmed.

Kansas Department of Corrections

Inmates turned over a tactical response vehicle, made weapons out of broken pieces of glass, and tried to run over a corrections officer with a commandeered cart, during a riot Tuesday night at the Norton Correctional Facility in north-central Kansas, according to a copy of the prison's log obtained by KCUR.

The threat posed by inmates was serious enough that, at one point, responding officers were told to use lethal force if necessary.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach requested voter data from all 50 states as part of his work on a presidential commission on voter fraud. In response, the ACLU of Kansas is considering its legal options, including a possible lawsuit.

Frank Morris / KCUR

Hundreds of people, including members of the activist group Indivisible KC, looked for answers at a town hall hosted by U.S. Sen. Jerry Moran, a Republican from Kansas, Monday morning.

The Republican's town hall at the Lenexa Conference Center was his first in Johnson County in over a year. It was a long time coming for some.

"Indivisible has been asking for a town hall in the eastern part of the state since January and we finally got one,” Indivisible KC Board Member Leslie Mark said.

A special session focused on solving Kansas' nettlesome school funding problem begins Thursday. At stake: school itself. The Kansas Supreme Court has threatened a statewide shutdown of schools if lawmakers don't make funding more equitable before June 30.

It's not an overstatement, then, to say most Kansans will be impacted by what happens in Topeka over the next few days.