Laura Ziegler

Laura Ziegler began her career at KCUR as a reporter more than 20 years ago. She became the news director in the mid 1980's and  in 1988,  went to National Public Radio in Washington, D.C. as a producer for Weekend Edition Saturday with Scott Simon.

In 1993, she came back to Kansas City as the Midwest correspondent for National Public Radio. Among the stories she covered - the floods of 1993, the ongoing farm crisis and rural affairs, and presidential campaigns.

After the birth of her 3rd child, Laura returned to KCUR as producer of Under the Clock, a weekly talk show broadcast live from Union Station. It was hosted by former Kansas City mayor Emanuel Cleaver. When he was elected 5th district Congressman in 2002, Laura returned to KCUR as a part-time reporter and producer.

Laura has won numerous awards for her work, including three regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

In 1992, Laura was awarded a Jefferson Fellowship in Journalism with the East West Center at the University of Hawaii which took her to China, Japan, Burma, Bangladesh and Thailand.  In 1990, she was part of a reporting trip to the then -Soviet Union with the American Center for International Leadership.

Laura graduated with a Bachelors Degree in Anthropology from Vassar College.

She, her husband, and their three children - Julia, Ellie, and Benjamin, live with Laura's father in the house in which she was born.

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National Democrats are targeting three-term Kansas Rep. Kevin Yoder as vulnerable in their attempt to retake Congress in 2018.

Six Democrats are competing for the right to challenge Yoder next November.

If third-quarter campaign finance reports are any indication, the Republican incumbent's campaign is mounting a serious defense.

Wikipedia

High-level NATO officials from 14 countries concluded secret meetings in Kansas City this week. In the meeting, the NATO Medical Working Group heard details about biosecurity research at Kansas State University.

President Richard Myers told the NATO representatives he’d seen bioterror threats up close during his time as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

He said the U.S., and particularly the Midwest, are potential targets of such threats.

Ron Trewyn is the liaison for the National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility at K–State.

NASA HQ PHOTO / Creative Commons, flickr

The path of totality, marked by today's historic total eclipse of the sun, arcs across much of Kansas City and its surrounding areas.

Laura Ziegler / Twitter

With the rising incidence of terrorist attacks in recent years, concern is growing about potential threats to the nation’s food supply. Sponsors of a new federal law to address the risk of agro-terrorism talked with officials about best practices and policies on Friday, Aug. 21, in Kansas City.

It was a roundtable of military, political and academic officials who might find themselves responding to such a threat.

Laura Ziegler / KCUR

In the last few years, professional sports teams have begun to realize that noisy stadiums can be hard on people with autism and other special needs. Among them are the Kansas City Royals, whose front-office officials happen to include several fathers of such kids.

Laura Ziegler / KCUR

Atchison, Kansas, population 11,000, has some of the same challenges facing other small towns around the country: They've had a hard time keeping businesses, retaining jobs and attracting young people.

But one thing that feels different here is their economic struggles feel linked to the town's rich history as a 19th century gateway to the west.

Johnson County Sheriff's Office

The suspected gunman in the Feb. 22 shooting that left one man dead and two injured at an Olathe, Kansas, bar asked two Indian nationals if their “status was legal” before shooting them, according to a probable cause affidavit released Monday morning from Johnson County District Court.

The document, which outlines the police case for detention of the suspect, says that roughly 30 minutes before the shooting, the three victims were seated in the patio area at the front of the neighborhood bar, Austins Bar and Grill near 151st and Mur-Len.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach was in New York on Thursday for another meeting with President-elect Donald Trump.

After his highly-publicized first meeting with Trump in New Jersey on Nov. 20, Republican Party officials in Kansas are speculating this second round is more than a suggestion that Kobach will land a job in the new administration.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

After certifying the Kansas election results, Secretary of State Kris Kobach told reporters in Topeka this week he agrees with President-elect Donald Trump's unsubstantiated claim that ballots cast by non-citizens cost him the popular vote.

It comes as no surprise: Trump's assertion sounds like something that could have come from the secretary himself.

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