Lindsey Herkommer DeVries

Art Reviewer

Lindsey Herkommer DeVries is from Dallas, Texas. She earned her B.A. in Art History from the University of Texas at Austin in 2007, and M.A. in Art History from Southern Methodist University in May 2012.

Over the course of these two degrees, she focused her research on Modern and contemporary art from the United States, Western Europe, and Latin America.

Currently, she teaches art foundations and art history at Wichita State University.

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Art Review
5:00 am
Wed May 13, 2015

Art Review: Strike A Quick Pose!

Credit Lamphouse Photo Co.

Some of my most treasured photographs come from two local photo booths: Lamphouse Photo Co. and Linnebur & Miller. These are two distinctly different operations, but both provide unconventional experiences for truly remarkable photographs.

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Commentary
9:19 am
Wed April 29, 2015

Art Review: Women’s Invitational XX/7

Credit Lindsey Herkommer DeVries

With April’s Final Friday came the opening of Fisch Haus’s women’s invitational XX/7. Originally, the show began with the selection of five female artists, all Wichita-based.

From there, each artist selected the next, and then that artist selected the next, creating a curatorial structure of chance encounters.

Paris-based Dorthée Davoise fractures stone in her Untitled black and white collages of outcroppings, and crystallizes new geological forms - as if distilling memory - on a pristine white pages.

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Commentary
11:11 am
Thu April 16, 2015

Take A Trip And See Art Up Close

Exterior of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York.
Credit Wikimedia Commons

Traveling to see art is one of my greatest pleasures! Whether it’s hunting for Connie Ernatt’s Troll by the river, or jet setting to a far-flung part of the earth, nothing replaces the joy of going and seeing art. 

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Commentary
5:00 am
Wed April 1, 2015

Art Review: The Six Machinations Of Art Expo

Credit Lindsey Herkommer DeVries

    

March Final Friday was incredible! Yet, there was one show that people raved about, The Six Machinations of Art Expo at Diver Studio—and for good reason.

The exhibition was put on by: Brady Hatter, Nam Le, Mike Miller, Chiyoko Myose and the ever-enigmatic Linnebur & Miller.

Brady’s giant spider robot with 8-foot legs captivated audiences, and will later be installed at Shocker Hall. Playful sculptures like An Alternate to Biology - Wasps on Parade tickled the tops of peoples’ heads, making them squee and smile.

 

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Commentary
8:15 am
Wed March 18, 2015

Five Alchemists: Contemporary Photographers Explore 19th-Century Techniques

Art credit: Heidi Kirkpatrick, Ivy, 2014. Cyanotype photogram on vintage child’s dress, 26 x 58 x 11 inches. Courtesy Wallspace Gallery, Santa Barbara, California.

If you’ve been to the Wichita Art Museum to see the daguerreotype exhibition Photographic Wonders but did not go downstairs, you missed a significant show.

Typically, WAM does a call-and-response structure with the main attraction upstairs and a response show downstairs. But this response show, Five Alchemists: Contemporary Photographers Explore 19th-century Techniques, marks three important landmarks for WAM:

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Art Review
5:00 am
Wed February 18, 2015

Arts Commentary: How Well Do The Mayoral Candidates Stack Up On The Arts?

Credit wichita.gov

I attended the Mayoral Candidate Forum hosted by The Arts Council last week, and I’ve been thinking a lot about what happened.

With few exceptions, the mayoral candidates leave much to be desired when it comes to their understanding of the arts.

The candidates discussed art as: an education issue, a funding issue, a branding issue, a worker retention issue, or a tourism and entertainment issue. This is all art in the service of another cause, which is not inherently bad, just misguided – especially for the audience sitting across from them.

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Commentary
5:00 am
Wed February 4, 2015

Art: American Daguerreotypes

Credit Courtesy photo

    

The Wichita Art Museum has unveiled their newest exhibition Photographic Wonders: American Daguerreotypes from the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. A Daguerreotype is one of the earliest forms of photography. Invented in France by Louis Daguerre in 1839, Daguerre revolutionized scientific observation as well as art. He discovered how to fix an image on to a silver plate with out it fading away – something his predecessors had not yet solved.

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Art Review
5:00 am
Wed January 21, 2015

The Intersection Of Technology, Graffiti And Gallery Art

Slide to Unlock: Multi-Touch Painting Series, 2012 Vinyl print
Image courtesy of the Ulrich Museum

This Saturday, the Ulrich Museum opens the exhibition Evan Roth//Intellectual Property Donor. Roth’s work lives at the intersection of technology, graffiti and gallery art.

Open source and hacker philosophies are woven through his artistic practice, which also tie into his collaborative endeavors, like the Graffiti Research Lab and Free Art and Technology Lab or F.A.T. Lab.

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Commentary
5:00 am
Wed January 7, 2015

Art: Looking Forward To A Colorful 2015

Evan Roth, Propulsion Painting: Ball, 2012.
Credit Image courtesy of the Ulrich Museum

2014 brought us some stellar art exhibitions! Some of my favorites were: the Ulrich Museum’s Bruce Connor retrospective; American Moderns at the Wichita Art Museum; Randy Regier’s installation of TYTON at the Salina Arts Center; and George Ferrandi’s performance for Harvester Arts that gave a small, but lucky audience an experience that changed hearts, minds and opinions on Performance Art – I know it did for me.

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Commentary
5:00 am
Wed December 10, 2014

Art: Fancy Flakeovers And Snow Spa Treatments

Do you know Linnebur & Miller? You should.

This artist duo is comprised of Hallie Linnebur and Meghan Miller. They’re one of the finest examples of avant-garde, contemporary performance art with a soul. Their performances are otherworldly, like their creative powers are channeled through fantastic divination. Their good-natured humor gives the performances warmth and vitality, something beautifully human for audiences to connect with.

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