Lindsey Herkommer DeVries

Art Reviewer

Lindsey Herkommer DeVries is from Dallas, Texas. She earned her B.A. in Art History from the University of Texas at Austin in 2007, and M.A. in Art History from Southern Methodist University in May 2012.

Over the course of these two degrees, she focused her research on Modern and contemporary art from the United States, Western Europe, and Latin America.

Currently, she teaches art foundations and art history at Wichita State University.

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Commentary
7:26 am
Wed August 22, 2012

Art Review: Alexander Calder

Calder mobile in the National Gallery of Art
Eric Wilcox Flickr

Alexander Calder was an American sculptor best known for his large mobiles – kinetic sculptures that use simple air currents to bring life to line, color and shape. A Calder sculpture is instantly recognizable by its awkward geometric shapes delicately balanced on long spindly wires, giving it an almost skeletal look.

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Commentary
5:00 am
Wed August 8, 2012

Art Review: Naymlis Entertainment

I recently attended one of the most avant-garde art events I've seen in Wichita for some time. This event brought together local art, music, and food trucks to Abode Venue for a dynamic night of cutting edge culture.

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Commentary
10:51 am
Wed July 25, 2012

Art Review: Louise Nevelson

Louise Nevelson, Night Tree, 1971. Cor-ten steel, 128 1/2 x 41 x 30 in. Ulrich Museum of Art, Wichita State University. Gift of the artist and the WSU Student Government Association.

Louise Nevelson was a key American sculptor in the mid-20th century. Her Modernist artwork changed the world of sculpture – much like what Jackson Pollock did for painting.

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Commentary
11:21 am
Wed July 18, 2012

Art Review: Gerald Hill

CityArts is currently showing the work of photographer Gerald Hill in the solo exhibition Black and White Photography from Gerald Hill.  Hill’s practice spans over 30 years. During this time, he gained representation through galleries in Dallas, Kansas City, Santa Fe, and Topeka. The camera manufacturer Canon has awarded and licensed his photographic work on the National Park System as well.

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Commentary
8:32 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Art Review: Herb and Dorothy Vogel

Building an art collection seems like a practice far removed from the lives of average people. Purchasing art feels like something only wealthy people can do. So how is it that one of the most formidable art collections in our country was built on the salaries of a librarian and a postal clerk?

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Commentary
5:00 am
Wed June 27, 2012

Art Review: Francisco Zúñiga’s “Three Women Walking”

KMUW

Wichita State University is home to many exceptional sculptures permanently displayed throughout campus. Recently, Francisco Zúñiga’s “Three Women Walking” was re-located from its original placement due to the massive renovations underway at the Rhatigan Student Center. Moving this hefty bronze sculpture was no small feat. Weighing in at two tons, it required construction equipment and precision guidance to situate the work just north of its original location.

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Commentary
9:53 am
Wed June 13, 2012

Art Review: Mary Cassatt and American Impressionism

Mary Cassatt's "Mother and Child" (1890) is currently in the Roland P. Murdock collection at the Wichita Art Museum.

In the late 19th century, Impressionist painting was the avant-garde style coming out of Paris. This style explored the formal qualities of color and light through loose brushwork and open compositions. Yet Impressionists painters, such as Edgar Degas and Edouard Manet, were not just painting pretty pictures. They depicted contemporary urban life in Paris, and the subject matter scandalized art patrons who were more accustomed to classical scenes.

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Commentary
8:39 am
Wed May 30, 2012

Art Review: Visions of Mexican Art

Graciela Iturbide Wichita Art Museum

Earlier this spring, the Wichita Art Museum opened the exhibition Visions of Mexican Art. This exhibition serves as an introduction to the modern and contemporary painting, sculpture and photography of 53 Mexican artists.

This collection belongs to the Mexican Ministry of Finance and Public Credit. They acquired the artwork through a “Payment-in-kind” policy that began in 1957, which allowed artists to submit artwork as form of tax payment.

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Commentary
7:20 am
Wed May 16, 2012

Art Review: Keeper of the Plains

The Keeper of the Plains is a monumental sculpture that marks the confluence of the Big and Little Arkansas Rivers.

The Keeper of the Plains is a monumental sculpture that marks the confluence of the Big and Little Arkansas Rivers. Rising 44 feet in the air, this Cor-Ten steel sculpture of a Native American chief is a popular site for Wichita visitors and residents alike. The proud figure stands tall with his back arched, offering something invisible to the sky with his upturned palms. The crisp lines of the stylized figure give it striking silhouette. But the large headdress and waving fringe gives the figure movement and life.

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Commentary
7:41 am
Wed May 2, 2012

Art Review: Makes It Into Matter

Jodi Lightner

his past Final Friday, CityArts opened their show, Makes It Into Matter, featuring an installation by artist Jodi Lightner and sound artist Ryan Mackey.

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