Lindsey Herkommer DeVries

Art Reviewer

Lindsey Herkommer DeVries is from Dallas, Texas. She earned her B.A. in Art History from the University of Texas at Austin in 2007, and M.A. in Art History from Southern Methodist University in May 2012.

Over the course of these two degrees, she focused her research on Modern and contemporary art from the United States, Western Europe, and Latin America.

Currently, she teaches art foundations and art history at Wichita State University.

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Abode of Chaos (thierry ehrmann) / Flickr

Looks like we’ve survived another apocalypse!

Paul Stein / PaulSteinJC / Flickr

The Wichita Art Museum has assembled a new exhibition from their permanent collection. It’s called “Occupy Art: Protest and Empathy for the Worker.”

Emily Brookover

This Final Friday, Go-Away Garage on South Commerce offers the show The Function of Form: New Works by Emily R. Brookover. The show is an eclectic collection of intimate drawings small enough to be doodles-- but they are so highly rendered, it would be a shame to call them that.

Fletcher Powell / KMUW

As family comes into town for the Thanksgiving holiday, show them the creative side of Wichita. Many of the city’s museums will keep normal business hours next week-- except for the holiday itself-- which gives Wichitans a chance to show off their city.

Wichita Art Museum

On Friday, the Wichita Art Museum debuts a new series of events they’re calling “Art Chatter.” In collaboration with WAM Contemporaries and the Young Professionals of Wichita, this event offers a fresh way to learn about projects, happenings, and current thoughts on the local art scene.  It’s a renewed effort to make the museum a dynamic place for the community; a place that reflects the range of creative spirits in Wichita.

October Final Friday holds in store two incredible one-night-only shows that should not be missed. The first is at Diver’s Studio with a show titled Watch and Adsorb. That is adsorb with a “d” – a scientific word that refers to a surface-based process of molecules adhering together. This limitless process of surface tension sets the perfect tone for the work of James Porter and his collaborators, Franklin Ackerly and Texas artist Jeff Wheeler, for their Kansas debut exhibition.

© The Felix Gonzalez-Torres Foundation

Wichita State University Contemporary Art History Professor Dr. Royce Smith has organized and curated a small, yet potent show titled, Response to Provocation: Living Memoirs of the Culture Wars. Installed in the McKnight Art Center at WSU, this is a mature-themed show that draws connections between the Culture Wars of the 1990’s and today’s on-going social and cultural debates. The University serves as the ideal environment to have these productive discussions.

Ulrich Museum of Art

The Ulrich Museum exuberantly reopened last weekend with a refreshed space that may appear the same, but is actually full of major upgrades that really make the space feel polished. But the delight of the Ulrich reopening begins well before entering the gallery space.

The Ulrich’s huge yarn bomb effort can been seen campus-wide and is a tremendous success. Even though I was skeptical about the concept of sanctioned graffiti, this project convinced me that yarn bombing, authorized or not, will always be delightful.

Toni Parks / The Gordon Parks Foundation

The art world tends to lull during the summer. But around this time, as (hopefully) cooler temperatures approach, that lull grows into quiet anticipation as the museums, galleries, and other art institutions begin to turn up the heat with heavy-hitting fall exhibitions.

As Wichita enters into the fall season, there are some changes to the local art scene. Regrettably, some key contemporary art galleries have lost their spaces, most notably Tangent Lab and NakedCity Gallery.

Eric Wilcox / Flickr

Alexander Calder was an American sculptor best known for his large mobiles – kinetic sculptures that use simple air currents to bring life to line, color and shape. A Calder sculpture is instantly recognizable by its awkward geometric shapes delicately balanced on long spindly wires, giving it an almost skeletal look.

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