Richard Crowson

Editorial commentator

Richard Crowson is not only a editorial commentator for KMUW. He's also a cartoonist, an artist and a banjo player.

You might have heard him play with his band Pop & The Boys or with his wife at their standing gig at Watermark Books & Cafe. Richard is also KMUW's editorial cartoonist.

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Richard Crowson
Richard Crowson

There’s a creeping, ghoulish specter out there haunting the state of Kansas this Halloween. The green, misty tentacles of its hot, fetid breath are curling and twining around us and even entering the very ears of Kansans everywhere. It’s called dark money.

The secretive spending by special interest groups during this election season has led to Kansas being the state with the “highest percentage of TV ads paid for by secretive outside money,” according to a recent story in the Wichita Eagle.

Pity poor Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach. He finds himself recently in the unenviable situation of having to argue against his own intentions. Here is a man who has spent years working feverishly to keep certain people from voting. 

Richard Crowson
DonkeyHotey, flickr Creative Commons

Let me just say that as a political cartoonist, I love having the Republican elephant and Democratic donkey symbols to work with. They are so universally understood that I notice when speaking to elementary school students that by the ages of 9 or 10, most of them know what the elephant and the donkey stand for.

Richard Crowson

Don’t you feel sorry for all those millions of unfortunate souls who live in temperate, predictable, humdrum climates, while we in Kansas get to enjoy the glorious splendor of seasonal fickleness?

Blistering windy summers morph into mild, windy falls which gradually change into ice-age-y, windy winters, which then give way to spring’s warmth and…um… windiness.

I’m not a huge fan of guns. But I used to like them. At one time I had 2 rifles, 7 pistols (including a snub-nose .38!) and a Tommy gun. I blasted away at anything that moved. It made me feel powerful and important. I was 9. My room was protected, not by Smith and Wesson but by Mattel.

hotgossipitalia / Flickr / Creative Commons

Our celebrity-obsessed culture has a lot of trouble handling death. Arguably our ordinary everyday American culture does as well, but in the aftermath of Robin Williams’ passing, it’s become obvious that the end of a celebrity’s life can just leave us mystified.

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