Sam Zeff

EDUCATION REPORTER, Kansas News Service

Sam covers education for KCUR and the Kansas News Service. Before joining the station in August 2014 he covered health and education for KCPT.

Sam began his career at KANU in Lawrence. He hosted Morning Edition at WHYY in Philadelphia where he also covered organized crime, politics and government corruption.

The Overland Park, Kansas, native has won a National News and Documentary Emmy for investigative reporting, four Edward R. Murrow awards and four National Headliner Awards. Sam was assistant news director at the ABC station in the Twin Cities, executive producer at the NBC station in St. Louis and executive producer of special projects at the CBS stations in Minneapolis and Kansas City.

Sam was educated at the University of Kansas.

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Sam Zeff / KCUR

Despite the ongoing fight over how much Kansas should spend on schools, the Legislature did at least one thing this year that almost all educators were pleased with: For the first time, it included all-day kindergarten in the school funding formula.

That means districts no longer have to use money from other parts of their budgets or charge parents for all-day K.

J. Schafer / KPR

When you go to a University of Kansas football game this year, you'll notice some old things and some new things.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas News Service/File photo

This story was updated on Wednesday at 11:42 a.m.

Attorneys for the state and the Legislature faced a barrage of questions from skeptical Kansas Supreme Court justices Tuesday scrutinizing the Legislature’s school finance plan.

k-state.edu

What's the best college campus in Kansas for LBGTQ students?

Many might guess the University of Kansas in Lawrence, long considered a progressive bastion, but according to CollegeChoice.net, the best bet for LGBTQ students in Kansas is in Manhattan, at Kansas State University.

K-State ranked as the 45th best choice in the country.

Kansas News Service/File photo

School districts across Kansas are breathing a bit easier after the Legislature passed a school funding plan and a tax law that provides the money for it.

Kansas News Service/File photo

On Day 108 of the Kansas Legislature’s session, lawmakers got down to business. They passed a school funding bill that adds nearly $300 million over two years for public education, then they approved a $1.2 billion tax plan.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio/File photo

Members of the Kansas House have rejected a bill that combined a new school funding system and a tax increase.

Kansas News Service

Updated Wednesday at 11:54 a.m. 

After 10 hours of debate, a dozen amendments and a timeout to talk taxes, the Kansas Senate early Wednesday advanced a school finance plan, which they approved in a final vote of 23-16 later the same morning.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Following a four-day Memorial Day holiday, Kansas lawmakers get back to work on Tuesday.

Senators will take up a school finance bill with a funding formula that looks a lot like what the House passed – with weightings for things like at-risk kids and English language learners.

The big difference is the dollar figure: The House bill would add $279 million in new money for schools over two years.

The Senate version passed out of committee last week calls for less: $240 million.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

The Kansas House debated a new school finance plan for five hours Wednesday, taking up two dozen amendments and finally voting 81-40 to advance a bill not much different from the one that had come out of committee. The measure is slated to get a final vote in the House Thursday. Then it will be the Senate’s turn.

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