Sanda Moore Coleman

Theater Commentator

Sanda Moore Coleman received an MFA in creative writing from Wichita State University in 1991. Since then, she has been the arts and community editor for The Martha's Vineyard Times, a teaching fellow at Harvard University, and an assistant editor at Image. In 2011, she received the Maureen Egan Writers Exchange prize for fiction from Poets & Writers magazine. She has spent more than 30 years performing, reviewing, and writing for theatre.

Giuseppe Verdi created the opera La Traviata, or The Fallen Woman, set to the work of Italian librettist Francesco Piave. Originally titled Violetta, after the main character, the opera is based on the play “The Lady of the Camellias,” which was, in turn, adapted from the novel by Alexandre Dumas fils. The story concerns a dying courtesan who falls in love with a young man, and is persuaded to sacrifice her brief happiness to protect the young man's future. It made its onstage debut at La Fenice opera house in Venice on March 6th, 1853.

The Fringe Festival began in Scotland as a reaction to commercial theatre; small outlying theatre groups that were not accepted for a festival decided to perform anyway, at the edges of the festival, thus earning the name “fringe.” While the concept has come to describe increasingly various types of performance art, two characteristics remain: affordability and originality. The Wichita Fringe Festival is a day-long event that features short original scripts written and performed by high school students from schools around the city.

Little Women, by Louisa May Alcott, is a well-loved Civil War-era novel that has been adapted for stage and screen again and again. 

I Love You Because is a musical in two acts, reportedly inspired by Jane Austen's novel Pride and Prejudice, with music by Joshua Salzman and book and lyrics by Ryan Cunningham. The pair met while attending NYU as graduate students in musical theater writing, and began writing the songs for this show while they were still students.

Before the chasm between fact and delusion became a defining feature of our shared experience of life, illusion—otherwise known as the art of magic—was performed on stage and on the street for the amazement and enjoyment of audiences around the globe.

As we kick our way through the holiday season, you may find yourself looking for something a bit different from the rest—a palate cleanser, perhaps, something that will dilute the ultra sugar while yet remaining sweet. The Theatre League in Wichita just might have what you are looking for—Kinky Boots, the story of Charlie Price, a shoe factory owner, and Lola, the drag queen who helps save his business. Ultimately, these two people from completely different worlds find that they do have something in common, after all.

People who believe the arts are not fundamental to a good education are perhaps defining too narrowly the purpose of art, and the skills that come with practicing creative expression.

The holiday season has arrived, which means we are eating, we are drinking, and we are as merry as we can make ourselves. If you are already making promises to exercise more to fight off the cookies and eggnog, you might be pleased to hear that going to the theatre actually burns calories.

The William Inge Center for the Arts recently announced that playwright Carlyle Brown has been selected to receive the William Inge Distinguished Achievement in the American Theatre Award at the 37th annual Inge Theatre Festival in May of 2018. 

It took a mere six weeks for the composer Gaetano Donizetti to compose the music for the comic opera L'elisir d'amore, and the work was an instant hit when it debuted in May of 1832 in Milan.