Sarah Bagby

Book reviewer

Sarah Bagby is the owner of Watermark Books & Café, and publisher of Watermark Press. As such, she has been reading and recommending books to readers for over 30 years. Involved in numerous regional and national industry organizations, she advocates for issues facing local independent businesses.

She loves her store and café, and all the opportunities it affords the staff and customers to come together to create a vibrant literary culture in Wichita and Kansas.

She is married to Eric Cale and they have one daughter.

The scene that opens Bill Clegg's impressive novel Did You Ever Have A Family is of a fire burning down Jane Ried's home.

Stephanie Clifford is a crime writer for the New York Times. She moved to New York from Seattle and has the perfect vantage point to tell the age-old story of wanting what we can’t have.

Kate Walbert's elegant and compact new novel The Sunken Cathedral takes its name from a composition by Debussy, who is said in the book to be to music what Cezanne is to painting--Impressionist.

"My mother and father named me Aron, but my father said they should have named me, ‘What Have You Done,’ and my uncle told everyone they should have called me, ‘What Were You Thinking.’"

The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen is set in motion by the fall of Saigon in 1975.

April marks a mass exodus of Vietnamese loyalists, primarily to the U.S. Our narrator works for a powerful general in the South Vietnamese Army as a trusted captain. He drives for the general, he negotiates for the general with the honest, the corrupt, the dissidents and the deserters. The trusted captain is ever present, but he never draws attention to himself. The trusted captain is also a double agent.

Paul Beatty and Mat Johnson are black novelists who successfully use humor to address difficult subjects in two new novels, as they take on the concept that we live in a "post-racial" America. What does that even mean?

A Story Of Discovery

Jun 1, 2015
Nina Subin

In lucid and lyrical prose, The Sunlit Night by Rebecca Dinerstein tells the story of two disparate souls who meet in Lofoten, a group of tiny islands above the Arctic Circle in Norway.

Heidi Pitlor, a seasoned editor for the annual Best American Short Stories, is the author of the newly released novel, The Daylight Marriage. If a prerequisite to success as a writer is extensive reading, then Pitlor’s editor gig guarantees her success.

We meet Hannah and Lovell on the evening of an explosive argument. They are about 40 and years into their marriage. Raising two children in the suburbs, there is no one thing wrong in their marriage, but rather, many small disappointments that have become big resentments over the years.

Sally Mann’s exhibition of photographs of her children brought her persecution. She was accused of exploitation because of the naked images she produced of them at their remote Virginia home.

But now, in her beguiling memoir Hold Still, she is on display on her own terms. Mann relates her life as an artist, a southerner, a mother, daughter and wife. Scrupulously illustrated with her own photographs, plus journals and mementos she found cleaning out her parents’ attic, the book draws you completely into the world of a thoughtful, articulate, funny and generous woman.

The Light of the World: A Memoir is an elegant book by Elizabeth Alexander, a poet, mother and widow. Her husband of 16 years was found dead next to their treadmill, just after his 50th birthday. The multiple blocked arteries that caused a massive heart attack had gone undetected by medical tests.

Pages