Scott Horsley

Scott Horsley is a White House correspondent for NPR News. He reports on the policy and politics of the Obama Administration, with a special emphasis on economic issues.

The 2012 campaign is the third presidential contest Horsley has covered for NPR. He previously reported on Senator John McCain's White House bid in 2008 and Senator John Kerry's campaign in 2004. Thanks to this experience, Horsley has become an expert in the motel shampoo offerings of various battleground states.

Horsley took up the White House beat after serving as a San Diego-based business correspondent for NPR where he covered fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley was a reporter for member station KPBS-FM, where he received numerous honors, including a Public Radio News Directors' award for coverage of the California energy crisis.

Earlier in his career, Horsley worked as a reporter for WUSF-FM in Tampa, Florida, and as a news writer and reporter for commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

President Obama leaves this afternoon for Saudi Arabia, and what could be an uncomfortable visit.

King Salman and neighboring leaders are unhappy with the president's overtures to their regional enemy, Iran. And Obama only added to that tension with a magazine interview that was anything but diplomatic.

"It's going to be a tough visit," says Ilan Goldenberg of the Center for a New American Security.

This week, as part of our A Nation Engaged project, NPR and some member stations will be talking about trade — both on the campaign trail and in communities around the country.

Trade has become a target this presidential campaign season.

Both Democrats and Republicans have been attacking trade agreements as "unfair" to American workers.

That resonates in places like Massena, N.Y., where voters cast primary ballots this week.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders has focused much of his presidential campaign on economic issues. He describes income inequality as the great economic and political issue of our time.

Less has been written about Sanders' approach to foreign policy. Here's a quick summary:

1. He was against the Iraq War (but he is not a pacifist)

Sanders has highlighted his opposition to the war in Iraq throughout the campaign as a way to draw a distinction with his Democratic rival, Hillary Clinton.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In recent days, Donald Trump has given a series of in-depth interviews shedding some light on what he means by the policy he calls "America First." The interviews are giving a clearer picture of the Republican presidential hopeful's approach to foreign policy.

Here are four things to know about Donald Trump's foreign policy:

1. It's unpredictable ... by design.

Reporters covering Donald Trump never know what he'll say or do next. And that's the way he likes it. Trump thinks it's an advantage for the United States to keep foreign leaders guessing.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The president is scheduled to deliver a speech in Havana, Cuba, which is where he's been traveling after the restoration of relations there. NPR's Scott Horsley is traveling with the president. Scott, good morning.

One of the last vestiges of the Cold War was buried Sunday, when President Obama set foot in Cuba. He's the first American president to visit the island since Calvin Coolidge, 88 years ago.

"Que bola', Cuba?" Obama tweeted in an informal greeting, moments after Air Force One touched down at Havana's Jose Marti Airport. "Looking forward to meeting and hearing directly from the Cuban people."

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