Sean Sandefur

Reporter

A photographer by trade, Sean got his feet wet in broadcast news as an intern at St. Louis Public Radio. It is here, he says, where he caught "the NPR bug."

A graduate of Webster University in St. Louis, Mo., Sean joined KMUW in January of 2014.

He often covers the intersection of government and citizenry. His story about chemical contamination in a west Wichita neighborhood won a national Society of Professional Journalists award for investigative journalism. His coverage of Wichita's "No Ferguson Here" movement won a regional Edward R. Murrow Award for hard news.

Sean also has experience in television, completing an internship at KTTC-TV in Rochester, Minn., where he covered massive flood damage as a multimedia journalist.

Outside of work, Sean has an addiction to baseball and has a cat named after his literary hero, Huckleberry Finn.

Ways To Connect

Nadya Faulx

The City of Wichita has decided to temporarily remove a Confederate flag from Veterans Memorial Park.

Cary and Kacey Jordan, flickr Creative Commons

Sedgwick County Commissioners unanimously approved a grant extension on Wednesday afternoon for the county’s Healthy Babies program, despite questioning its effectiveness.

The program offers advice and support for at-risk mothers in the hopes of decreasing the county’s infant mortality rate, which has consistently hovered above state and national averages.

Commissioners Richard Ranzau and Jim Howell said the county’s rate of 7.7 deaths per 1,000 live births isn’t improving.

Ho John Lee / Flickr

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach will officially have the power to prosecute voter fraud starting Wednesday.

Carla Eckels

The U.S. Supreme Court announced Monday they won't hear a lawsuit that looked to add proof of citizenship requirements to federal registration forms in both Kansas and Arizona.

Sean Sandefur

Tomorrow marks National HIV Testing Day throughout the country. It’s estimated that 1.2 million Americans have the disease and about 14 percent of those individuals don’t know they’re infected. 


(photo by Jeffrey Beall (Own work) [CC-BY-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org)

This story originally aired June 24, 2015, during All Things Considered.

A religious liberty group says members of a Native American sweat lodge at a VA medical center in Wichita have been subjected to discrimination aimed at shutting down their religious services.

The Liberty Institute sent a letter Wednesday to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs concerning the Robert J. Dole Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

Sean Sandefur file photo

Wichita City Council members are looking to nail down some of the city's future budget priorities. It's all part of the new Comprehensive Investments Plan.

John Schlegel is director of planning for the Wichita-Sedgwick County Planning department. He recently provided an update to Mayor Jeff Longwell and to city council members.

“You’re put in a very difficult position of having to meet all of these demands from your constituents, without the resources that you would need to meet them,” Schlegel said.

Raymond Wambsgans, flickr Creative Commons

The Kansas Highway Patrol is struggling to fill open positions for state troopers.

There are approximately 21 counties in Kansas that have no dedicated state trooper, and 34 that have only one. According to Kansas Highway Patrol Lieutenant Adam Winters, they currently have the fewest number of officers in about a decade.

Winters said a number of officers have retired in recent years and that applications to fill those positions aren’t coming in.

But they’re working to fix that.

Sean Sandefur

An educational program that originated in North Carolina twenty years ago has now made its way to Kansas. Cheney High School and Hiawatha Elementary will be the first schools in the state to implement the A+ Program, which integrates the arts into subjects such as math and history. KMUW's Sean Sandefur reports...

Amy Delamaide, flickr Creative Commons

City officials say Wichita's bus system will see a decline in service next year without added revenue. KMUW’s Sean Sandefur has more.

The future of Wichita’s operating budget was presented to city council members on Tuesday morning.

Mark Manning, budget officer with the city’s finance department, says future budgets look to be balanced, but that future revenue growth won’t be enough to fill a reduction in transit funding.

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