Zack Gingrich-Gaylord

Community Business Advancement/ Hip-Hop commentator

Zack Gingrich-Gaylord is a lifelong listener to public radio in general, and KMUW in particular. He was born and grew up in Wichita, and has lived in Lawrence and Newton.

After working for 15 years in the restaurant industry, he changed career paths and began working for KMUW in corporate support. He enjoys bringing the community of public radio listeners to the broader Wichita community.

Hope that’s good enough. I was raised not to talk about myself. Well, not really. But I heard that line on TV the other day, thought I’d try it out.

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Commentary
6:30 am
Mon April 13, 2015

The True King Of Hip Hop

DJ Premier at work
Credit Markus Rödder / Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license

The turntables are to hip hop what the guitar is to rock and roll. Or, more precisely, they are what the guitar, bass, drums and keyboard are to rock and roll.

Hip hop was born from the turntables, and through hip hop, the turntables were transformed from a simple playback device into an instrument that has been featured in countless jazz arrangements and even symphonies.

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Commentary
6:30 am
Mon March 30, 2015

Hip Hop And The Politics Of Now

Kendrick Lamar
Credit Merlijn Hoek / Wikiportrait / Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported

Rapper Kendrick Lamar’s new album To Pimp a Butterfly is as much manifesto and rallying cry as it is an LP. While it’s now difficult to listen to hip hop without hearing echoes of Ferguson, Mo., Lamar intentionally places Butterfly squarely in the center of that conversation. The online magazine ‘The Root’ called it the music of the Black Lives Matter hashtag.

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Commentary
6:30 am
Mon March 16, 2015

The Mask Of Doom

MF DOOM

Masks are more than a flashy stage gimmick for the emcee and producer MF DOOM. The iron mask, first worn by his namesake, the comic-book villain Doctor Doom, serves as the central conceit for what is now a decades-long exploration of hip hop’s more formal, structuralist elements.

DOOM raps primarily in two bar couplets, heavily coded with slang, and layers and layers of abstraction and association, as in the dizzying verses of the song “Figaro”:

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Commentary
6:30 am
Mon March 2, 2015

Keeping It RIGHT

Plug 1 and Plug 2 of De La Soul
Credit blackouthiphop.com / Google Images / Creative Commons

I read an article criticizing the movie Whiplash that argued its violence is over-the-top and unrealistic— the movie positions violence as part of the relationship between student and teacher. The criticism was that the relationship was so rare as to be unrealistic.

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Commentary
6:30 am
Mon February 16, 2015

Something You Do Vs. Something You Live

Graffiti by Banksy
Credit timtimes / Flickr / Creative Commons

One of the primary topics emcees rap about, aside from their own skill on the microphone, is hip hop itself—the music, the fashion, what hip hop is and what it isn’t.

It’s a tautology that, as far as I can tell, is practically non-existent in other forms of music. Rock and roll dabbles in the occasional self reference, but the act is nearly compulsory in hip hop. If every emcee’s first verse is about how amazing they are, their second verse is about how much they love hip hop.

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Commentary
6:30 am
Mon February 2, 2015

America Is Still Singing

"Mos def-11-mika" by Mikamote - Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons

    

In Walt Whitman’s poem “I Hear America Singing”, he writes of “the varied carols” he hears, ”each singing what belongs to him or her, and to none else/Singing with open mouths their strong melodious songs”.

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Commentary
6:30 am
Mon January 19, 2015

Way Back In The Day When Hip Hop Began

Credit hansthijs / Flickr / Creative Commons

When hip hop began, it sounded like this:

This is Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five, from 1979-- the year I was born, and six years after DJ Kool Herc invented the breakbeat. As one of the first hip hop records, it’s emblematic of a lot of early rap music: it’s a long track and the emcees throw in pretty much every rhyme in the book. At that point, hip hop was still largely party music, with rappers functioning primarily as boosters for the deejay.

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Commentary
11:47 am
Mon December 8, 2014

The Wild Edges Of Our Humanity

Credit erikjacobs / Flickr / Creative Commons

In a small, largely abandoned village along the coast in Belgium, the walls are covered in graffiti. What began as an effort by the few remaining locals to turn the town of Doel from a neglected company town into an artists’ colony has become something else entirely. The town now receives several thousand tourists annually, gawking at the bizarre setting. But they also take in many more vandals who are eager to exploit the obvious lack of regulations and absence of police.

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Commentary
12:36 pm
Mon November 24, 2014

Our Edifice Complex

Credit ivva / Flickr / Creative Commons

When it comes to our cities, we all have an edifice complex.

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Commentary
12:30 pm
Mon November 10, 2014

The Corporatization of Graffiti

Credit Fletcher Powell / KMUW

I’ve spent a lot of time practicing the art of seeing graffiti. After a few years, my eye is now automatically able to seek out those sweet spots on buildings or signs where graffiti ought to be—and in the right parts of town, it usually is. I’m good, but there are still times that graffiti, or something pretending to be graffiti, will surprise me.

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