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The Salt
2:32 am
Mon May 27, 2013

Twinkies' Return Is Mostly Sweet News For Kansas Town

Hostess Twinkies are offered for sale in Chicago, part of the last shipment of Hostess products the company made in 2012.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 4:17 am

The news of Hostess' return to Emporia, Kan., sparked an ecstatic response in this beleaguered town — even though there will be only half as many jobs.

The new company, formed when investors bought Hostess' snack cake business, has hired longtime snack cake production veterans Pat Chambers and her husband, Bob, to help get the bakery here running again. Pat lost her job at the Hostess plant when it closed last November. Now, she sits beaming on her front porch, wearing a dirty Hostess work shirt.

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Shots - Health News
2:31 am
Mon May 27, 2013

For Many, Affordable Care Act Won't Cover Bariatric Surgery

Evidence is growing that bariatic surgery reduces health risks of obesity.
Life in View Science Source

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 3:00 pm

Uninsured Americans who are hoping the new health insurance law will give them access to weight loss treatments are likely to be disappointed.

That's especially the case in the Deep South, where obesity rates are among the highest in the nation, and states will not require health plans sold on the new online insurance marketplaces to cover medical weight loss treatments like prescription drugs and bariatric surgery.

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Shots - Health News
2:30 am
Mon May 27, 2013

Overweight People Are More Apt To Ditch Doctors

Going to the doctor may be uncomfortable for people who are worried about weight.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 7:08 am

Patients struggling with obesity can have a tough time finding the right doctor, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

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World
2:28 am
Mon May 27, 2013

Targets Of Disgraced Bo Xilai Still Languish In Jail

Chinese police lead a group of defendants, including millionaire and politician Li Qiang, to court on organized crime charges in 2009. Many of those arrested in now-imprisoned politician Bo Xilai's campaign against the mafia still remain in jail, despite serious legal questions about the process.
STR/AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 5:28 am

It was 5 p.m. on an ordinary Tuesday, and Li Ping was finishing up the company accounts before going to have a facial. She was working for her brother, Li Qiang, who owned one of the biggest private transport companies in Chongqing, a major city in southwestern China.

Suddenly, five plainclothes policemen barged into the room. They asked her name, then put a black hood over her head and drove her to a secret interrogation site. Her ordeal had begun.

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Around the Nation
6:01 am
Fri May 24, 2013

NYC Mayoral Candidate Uses Wrong Skyline On His Homepage

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 7:01 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Some photos on Twitter ended Anthony Weiner's congressional career. The latest online image, not quite as damaging. Weiner launched his campaign yesterday to be mayor of New York City, and a gorgeous city skyline showed up on his homepage: the skyline of Pittsburgh, my home town. I'm honored if the Web designer is impressed with our city's skyline.

Around the Nation
5:07 am
Fri May 24, 2013

Washington State Bridge Collapses, 3 People Injured

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 7:01 am

The collapse sent people and vehicles into the water Thursday night. Authorities say there were no fatalities. The bridge, about an hour north of Seattle, lost its northernmost span — taking out all lanes in both directions.

Parallels
3:11 am
Fri May 24, 2013

China's Air Pollution: Is The Government Willing To Act?

Skyscrapers are obscured by heavy haze in Beijing on Jan. 13. Air pollution remains a serious — sometimes overwhelming — problem, but researchers say environmental technology is available to solve it.
Ng Han Guan AP

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 10:55 am

Denise Mauzerall arrived in Beijing this year at a time that was both horrifying and illuminating. The capital was facing some of its worst pollution in recent memory, and Mauzerall, a Princeton environmental engineering professor, was passing through on her way to a university forum on the future of cities.

"I took the fast train from Beijing to Shanghai, and looking out the window for large sections of that trip, you couldn't see more than 20 feet," Mauzerall recalled.

To Mauzerall, the lesson was surprising and inescapable.

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Planet Money
1:54 am
Fri May 24, 2013

Can This Man Bring Silicon Valley To Yangon?

Lam Thuy Vo NPR

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 8:29 am

Like a proud father, Nay Aung opens up his MacBook Air to show me the Myanmar travel website he has built. But we wait 30 seconds for the site to load, and nothing happens.

"Today is a particularly bad day for Internet," he says. This is life in Myanmar today: Even an Internet entrepreneur can't always get online.

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Food
1:49 am
Fri May 24, 2013

Guava Paste And Tamarind? What To Do With Weird Food Gifts

Harrison Gowdy of Dayton, Ohio, has accumulated various Indian spices, guava paste and coconut oil — among other things.
Courtesy of Harrison Gowdy

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 7:59 am

This is an installment of NPR's ongoing Cook Your Cupboard, a food series about improvising with what you have on hand. Have a food that has you stumped? Submit a photo and we'll ask chefs about our favorites.

Harrison Gowdy of Dayton, Ohio, has developed a reputation among friends and family of liking everything and wasting nothing.

"Sometimes I'll even find things like Swiss chard dropped off on my doorstep," she says. And sometimes she receives foods that stump her.

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StoryCorps
1:46 am
Fri May 24, 2013

Military Moms: A Bond Borne From Shared Loss

Sally Edwards (left), 80, and Lue Hutchinson, 71, visited StoryCorps in Cincinnati. Their sons, Jack Edwards and Tom Butts, are buried at Arlington National Cemetery.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 7:22 am

In 1991, Kentucky residents Sally Edwards and Lue Hutchinson had sons serving in the Gulf War. Sally's son, Jack, was a Marine captain. Lue's son, Tom Butts, was a staff sergeant in the Army. The two men never knew each other, but today, their mothers are best friends.

Both soldiers were killed in February of 1991. Jack was 34. "They were the cover for a medical mission. The helicopter lost its top rotor blade, and they didn't make it back," Sally says.

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