abortion

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Some Kansas lawmakers want more detailed information provided to women who seek an abortion.

The Kansas House has advanced a bill that requires abortion providers to disclose additional details about a physician’s credentials, insurance and any disciplinary actions against them. It also says physicians must disclose if they have clinical privileges at any hospitals within 30 miles.

kscourts.org

The Kansas Supreme Court heard oral arguments Thursday in an appeal to remove a temporary injunction regarding a ban on a second-trimester abortion procedure.

J. Stephen Conn / flickr Creative Commons

The Kansas Supreme Court will hear oral arguments Thursday morning on whether the state constitution protects a woman’s right to an abortion. Last year the Kansas Court of Appeals said it does.

The Kansas appeals court upheld a trial judge’s decision to block a Kansas law banning the second-trimester abortion procedure known as “dilation and evacuation.”

kslegislature.org

A Kansas senator who compared Planned Parenthood to Dachau doubled down on his statement and called Planned Parenthood worse than Nazi concentration camps.

Sen. Steve Fitzgerald, a Republican from Leavenworth, told KCUR in Kansas City on Monday that he saw nothing wrong with the comparison, which he made in a letter to Planned Parenthood after a woman made a donation to the organization in his name.

Asked if he thought Planned Parenthood was akin to a Nazi concentration camp, he replied, “Worse. Much worse, much worse, much worse."

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

A Kansas Senate committee has advanced a bill that would update the information provided to a woman seeking an abortion.

The bill also specifies that the information must be printed in 12-point, Times New Roman font so it’s legible. It would add additional details about a physician’s credentials, insurance and any disciplinary actions against them.

Kathy Ostrowski with the group Kansans for Life says the change will give women more information about abortion providers.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Around 1,000 abortion opponents gathered at the Kansas Statehouse Monday for an annual rally marking the anniversary of Roe v. Wade, the decision that legalized abortion.

Gov. Sam Brownback told the crowd to keep its eyes on the Kansas Supreme Court. The high court is reviewing a lawsuit in which a lower court ruled that the state Constitution protects a woman's right to abortion.

“Yet this can never really be true, that abortion is a right," Brownback said. "Our rights come from God, and amongst them is the inherent right to life."

Elana Gordon / KCUR/File photo

A new federal rule barring states from withholding federal family planning funds from Planned Parenthood could prove to be a short-term victory for the organization.

Congressional Republicans have already put the rule on their hit list, and it may not survive the first 100 days of a Donald Trump administration.

The rule, posted Wednesday on the website of the Federal Register, is slated to take effect Jan. 18, two days before Inauguration Day.

Bloomsberries, flickr Creative Commons

An Oklahoma court has thrown out a law that required abortion clinics to have hospital admitting privileges.

The law required doctors who performed abortions in the state to be able to admit patients to nearby hospitals. Doctors must apply for the privileges and go through a credentialing process.

The court ruling that threw out the law is seen as positive by people who support abortion rights. Trust Women of Wichita – which runs Southwind Women's Center, the former site of Dr. George Tiller's clinic – has recently opened a clinic in Oklahoma.

Democracynow.org

  

Kansas was the birthplace of Prohibition and an epicenter of the anti-abortion movement.

Historian and political analyst Thomas Frank -- a Mission Hills, Kansas, native -- wrote a whole book, What's the Matter With Kansas, about how politics in the state has been fueled by conservative social ideals. But last Tuesday, Kansas went for Donald Trump, at the same time it voted in a more moderate Legislature.

kscourts.org

After roughly a million dollars in TV and radio ads plus a blizzard of postcards, the Kansas Supreme Court didn't change one bit with Tuesday's elections.

With a majority of precincts reporting, all four of the justices who had been targeted by the Republican Party, Kansans for Life and other conservative groups comfortably won retention.

Pages