Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt's office says it has paid outside attorneys nearly $1.2 million dollars to defend anti-abortion laws that have been enacted since January 2011.

The attorney general's office reported Monday that it has paid almost $770,000 to the Lawrence firm of Thompson, Ramsdell & Qualseth for fees and expenses in handling multiple federal and state lawsuits.

Abortion providers sued the state over special regulations adopted in 2011, and over a 2013 law requiring them to post certain material on their websites for women seeking abortions.

@govsambrownback / twitter.com

Gov. Brownback has promised to sign legislation which would ban a procedure used to terminate hundreds of pregnancies in Kansas every year. KMUW’s Carla Eckels reports…

Brownback made his pledge during a Statehouse rally on Thursday which drew hundreds of abortion opponents.

Kansans for Life sponsored the event that marked the 42nd anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court decision to legalize abortion across the country.

The latest proposal targets a method that would prohibit dismemberment of the fetus when doing a dilation and extraction abortion technique.  


A bill which would ban a certain type of abortion procedure was announced on Wednesday by a pro-life group and a Kansas Senator. KMUW's Aileen LeBlanc reports.

On Wednesday, the anti-abortion group National Right to Life announced a bill sponsored by State Senator Garrett Love of Montezuma. It's called the Unborn Child Protection from Dismemberment Abortion Act.

The bill would prohibit dismemberment of a fetus when doing a dilation and extraction technique.

AP Photo/John Hanna

A Kansas doctor who has been scrutinized for referring young patients for late-term abortions remains barred from practicing medicine after a state board decision. KMUW's Aileen LeBlanc reports...

The State Board of Healing Arts upheld the revocation of Dr. Ann Kristin Neuhaus' license to practice medicine.

Neuhaus provided second opinions for patients from Dr. George Tiller's clinic in 2003. Tiller was one of the very few doctors in the country who provided late term abortions.

A Kansas board is considering whether to continue barring a physician from practicing medicine after scrutinizing her referrals of young patients for late-term abortions and finding that she kept inadequate records.

One of four remaining clinics in Kansas that provide abortions has closed because its doctor and manager have retired.

The Aid For Women clinic in Kansas City, Kansas, closed Saturday. It's referring patients to two clinics in suburban Kansas City and one in Wichita.

Retiring clinic manager Jeff Pederson says former patients need to fight for reproductive rights instead of relying on clinic workers to wage that battle.

The Federal Election Commission has dismissed an anti-abortion group’s complaint alleging that an abortion rights political action committee helped finance the operations of a new clinic in Wichita.

The political action committee, Trust Women, announced Thursday it received a notice from the FEC this week dismissing the complaint filed last year by Operation Rescue.

The Trust Women Foundation opened a clinic last year in the late Doctor George Tiller’s former medical building.

The town of Jackson, Wyoming, has paid $10,000 to settle a federal lawsuit over the arrest of a Kansas anti-abortion protester.

Wichita’s Spirit One Christian Ministries pastor Mark Holick had sued Cheyenne and police officials following his arrest in 2011 on the town square.

Holick was arrested shortly after Jackson officials secured a state court order barring anti-abortion protesters from appearing on the town square.

His lawsuit charged that the arrest violated his civil rights.


The Sundance Film Festival selection After Tiller follows the lives and work of the only four doctors left in the country who still perform third-trimester abortions, after the murder of Dr. George Tiller in 2009. The Tallgrass Film Association is presenting a special screening of the movie at 7:30 at the Orpheum Theater.

Mediation Set In Kansas Abortion Threat Case

Nov 4, 2013

A federal appeals court has scheduled a mediation conference in the case of a Kansas abortion opponent who sent a letter to a Wichita doctor saying someone might place an explosive under her car.

The Justice Department has appealed an August ruling by U.S. District Judge J. Thomas Marten that Angel Dillard's letter is constitutionally protected speech. Marten summarily ruled the letter did not constitute a "true threat" under law.