ACLU

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

A civil rights group is seeking sanctions against Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach for hiding documents about his plans to change federal voting law amid a lawsuit challenging the state's proof-of-citizenship voter registration law.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW/File photo

The American Civil Liberties Union is fighting back against Secretary of State Kris Kobach's voting rules. This time it has to do with President Trump's recently announced Election Integrity Commission.

The ACLU has sent coordinated Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests to officials in Kansas, Indiana, New Hampshire, Maine, as well as the U.S. Election Assistance Commission. One person from each of these states has been appointed to the Election Integrity Commission, with Kris Kobach as the vice chair.

AP Photo

A federal judge has ordered Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach to turn over by Friday documents that he shared with then President-elect Donald Trump in a case challenging Kansas’ voter registration requirements.

A federal magistrate judge had previously directed Kobach to produce the documents, but Kobach sought review of the order. U.S. District Judge Julie Robinson on Wednesday denied Kobach’s request.

AP Photo

A federal magistrate says he wants to inspect documents that Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach shared with then President-elect Trump during the transition.

The order came in a case challenging the Kansas law requiring proof of citizenship for voter registration. The ACLU claims the requirement violates the federal motor voter act, which only requires voters to swear they are citizens. Kobach argues that has allowed non-citizens to register.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach asked a federal court Thursday to order the state to release to him a list of about 21,000 people who have temporary driver's licenses in an apparent effort to bolster his claims that noncitizens are voting.

The move comes in a civil lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union challenging a Kansas law requiring documentary proof of citizenship to register to vote.

Laura Spencer / KCUR/File photo

Oct. 18 is the deadline in Kansas to register to vote in next month's elections. But, as KMUW's Aileen LeBlanc reports, the documentation you need is not the same across the board.

This is an exceptional election in many ways, but in Kansas, a changing set of rules has made it downright confusing for many people.

Because of a recent court order, people who register with a federal form, such as at the DMV, do not need citizenship documents--while those who register using Kansas forms must present a passport or birth certificate.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas' Secretary of State Kris Kobach has avoided a contempt of court hearing by striking a deal with the ACLU on Thursday. 

Bloomsberries, flickr Creative Commons

A Kansas judge has ordered Secretary of State Kris Kobach to notify thousands of people who hadn't provided documents proving their citizenship that they will be allowed to vote for all offices in the November election.

Shawnee County District Judge Larry Hendrick's order affects more than 19,545 voters who registered at motor vehicle offices or with a federal form without providing documentary proof of U.S. citizenship.

The judge stopped short of issuing the permanent injunction sought by the American Civil Liberties Union. Kobach's office says it is reviewing the ruling.

Neil Conway, flickr Creative Commons

A huge majority of Kansans say that the penalties for most nonviolent drug possession crimes should be reduced.

The ACLU poll shows that 86 percent of Kansans either strongly support, or somewhat support, reducing all nonviolent drug possession from felonies to misdemeanors as a way to reduce the prison population in the state.

Kansas prisons are at about 101 percent capacity, and six out of ten respondents say they would rather reduce the population rather than build new prisons.

Sedgwickcounty.org

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach defended the state’s voter registration law in a federal appeals court on Tuesday. He says thousands of Kansans who registered to vote at the DMV without proving their citizenship should not be allowed to cast ballots.

A lower court said in May that those Kansans can vote, but Kobach wants that overturned. Kobach told the appeals court that Kansas is allowed to require citizenship documents that aren’t required under federal law.

Pages