American Civil Liberties Union

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas' Secretary of State Kris Kobach has avoided a contempt of court hearing by striking a deal with the ACLU on Thursday. 

Bloomsberries, flickr Creative Commons

A Kansas judge has ordered Secretary of State Kris Kobach to notify thousands of people who hadn't provided documents proving their citizenship that they will be allowed to vote for all offices in the November election.

Shawnee County District Judge Larry Hendrick's order affects more than 19,545 voters who registered at motor vehicle offices or with a federal form without providing documentary proof of U.S. citizenship.

The judge stopped short of issuing the permanent injunction sought by the American Civil Liberties Union. Kobach's office says it is reviewing the ruling.

Neil Conway, flickr Creative Commons

A huge majority of Kansans say that the penalties for most nonviolent drug possession crimes should be reduced.

The ACLU poll shows that 86 percent of Kansans either strongly support, or somewhat support, reducing all nonviolent drug possession from felonies to misdemeanors as a way to reduce the prison population in the state.

Kansas prisons are at about 101 percent capacity, and six out of ten respondents say they would rather reduce the population rather than build new prisons.

A Kansas judge has cleared the way for Secretary of State Kris Kobach to use a dual voting system to enforce the state’s proof-of-citizenship for new voters.

On Friday, Shawnee County District Judge Franklin Theis denied the American Civil Liberties Union’s request for a preliminary injunction to stop Kobach from implementing a new policy.

The American Civil Liberties Union and Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach are heading to court again in their battle over Kobach’s attempts to enforce a proof-of-citizenship requirement for new voters.

The ACLU hopes a Shawnee County judge will use Friday’s hearing to review its request for a temporary injunction to keep Kobach from imposing a new policy for the state’s Aug. 5 primary elections.

Kobach has said that Kansas residents who register with a national form will be allowed to complete full ballots, but only their votes in congressional races will be counted.