art

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Film director Wes Anderson announced last year that he wants to create an amusement park. He says that it would have "hundreds of animatronic characters and creatures, rides through vast invented landscapes and buildings, extensive galleries of textiles and sculptures, plus an ongoing original music score piped in everywhere," and he wants the whole thing to be designed by a musician named Mark Mothersbaugh.

Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

Sean Sandefur

A brand new 'Chinese Garden of Friendship' is debuting Friday afternoon at Botanica. Construction began just over a year ago, and since then, bright red pavilions, a jade dragon and a variety of koi fish have made it their home. KMUW’s Sean Sandefur has more…

    

A decorative wall is on the only thing that separates the new Chinese Garden of Friendship from Botanica’s parking lot. But go beyond those six inches of concrete and you’re transported into a winding garden with waterfalls and plum blossoms.

Sean Sandefur

There will be a cattle drive in downtown Wichita tonight as part of the Sundown Parade at Riverfest. Los Angeles-based artist Wayne White has created lively steers, cowboys and other familiar characters from Wichita’s history. KMUW’s Sean Sandefur got to see the artist at work…

Artist Wayne White walks through a sea of cardboard at Harvester Arts in Wichita's Old Town neighborhood. Some of the cardboard is assembled into stylized cartoon creatures; some of it is discarded on the floor, with jagged angles and dusty footprints.  

Wikimedia Commons

Traveling to see art is one of my greatest pleasures! Whether it’s hunting for Connie Ernatt’s Troll by the river, or jet setting to a far-flung part of the earth, nothing replaces the joy of going and seeing art. 

Image courtesy of the Ulrich Museum

This Saturday, the Ulrich Museum opens the exhibition Evan Roth//Intellectual Property Donor. Roth’s work lives at the intersection of technology, graffiti and gallery art.

Open source and hacker philosophies are woven through his artistic practice, which also tie into his collaborative endeavors, like the Graffiti Research Lab and Free Art and Technology Lab or F.A.T. Lab.

Jose Alvarado / Ulrich Museum of Art

    

When was the last time you saw an art show? I mean really saw. 

Charles Henry (amarilloposters) / Flickr / Creative Commons

In the late 1940s, a Midwestern salesman named Edward Seymour was looking for a better way to demonstrate his line of aluminum radiator paint to prospective buyers. Seymour and his wife hit upon the idea of combining the paint with a can of propellant, so they could spray the paint quickly onto a radiator’s surface and not have to spend the time using more tedious methods.

The idea of putting a propellant and something else into a can wasn’t new. Bug bombs specifically targeting malaria-infected mosquitoes were used in the Pacific during World War II.

While Anne Schaefer was here for her two-week stay as artist-in-residence for Harvester Arts, she conquered Shift Space Gallery with her signature stripes and dots for a vibrant installation titled In The Thick of It.

Schaefer’s syncopated rhythms of color and pattern span more than 80 feet. Her painting is methodical, but abrupt changes in her work keep us from getting too comfortable in our expectations.

Working on the installation Sen by artist Lisa Solomon was an all-hands-on-deck affair at the Ulrich Underground. I was one of many on the team and its completion was nothing short of a Herculean effort.

The title, Sen, is the Japanese word for ‘one thousand’. Most literally, this title describes the 1,000 hand-made doilies pinned to the wall. These doilies were made by participants from around the world.

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