Book Review

When Lee Sandlin was a young boy growing up in Chicago, each summer he was dropped off at the family home in Edwardsville, Ill., to stay with two great-aunts and two great-uncles. Sandlin describes his time there as a boot camp in old-fashioned values.

Antonia Lively Breaks the Silence by David Samuel Levinson is set in a sleepy university town a couple hours outside of New York City. The novel has a familiar cast of characters: an author, a book critic and the women who loved them.

Book Review: & Sons

Jul 29, 2013
npr.org

David Gilbert’s novel & Sons is about a somewhat reclusive author who has written a book that has captured the imaginations of readers through the decades, much like J.D. Salinger’s Catcher In The Rye.

I have a difficult time with books that require the reader to suspend disbelief. In fact, I avoid them. But not if the author is Andrew Sean Greer.

Book Review: Fin & Lady

Jul 1, 2013

Cathleen Schine's journey to becoming an author included brief stints in medieval history and shoe buying at Bloomingdale's. Not a likely trajectory toward a profession as a novelist, especially since she turned to writing as a fall-back career.

Set in New York City in the 1920s, The Other Typist by Suzanne Rindell is told from the viewpoint of Rose Baker, an unremarkable woman raised in an orphanage by nuns.

One beautiful thing about reading is the travel it allows. Through books, you can visit other times, places, or even dimensions.

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Jill McCorkle's Life After Life, set in fictional Fulton, N.C., is told through a chorus of characters that have a connection to the Pine Haven Retirement Community.

Book Review: Snapper

May 6, 2013
npr.org

Snapper is a collection of stories by Brian Kimberling.

Like making new friends later in life, we learn about protagonist Nathan Lochmueller through a series of stories and back-stories. 

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David Sedaris is known for his self-deprecating wit, obsessive behaviors and sardonic humor. His new book of essays, Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls, does not disappoint.

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